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How massive is supermassive? Astronomers measure more black holes, farther away
10 January 2018A team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including several Penn State scientists, announced new measurements of the masses of a large sample of supermassive black holes far beyond the local universe.
Capturing light in a waveguide array: Confined, insensitive light could improve lasers, solar cells
04 June 2018Cheaper and more efficient photonic devices, such as lasers, optical fibers, and other light sources, may be possible with confined light that is unaffected by imperfections in the material that confines it, according to new research.
Flies' disease-carrying potential may be greater than thought, researchers say
28 November 2017A new study adds further proof to the suspicion that houseflies and blowflies carry and spread a variety of species of bacteria that are harmful to humans.
Viruses up their game in arms race with immune system
14 August 2017In a classic example of the evolutionary arms race between a host and a pathogen, the myxoma virus -- introduced to control the rabbit population in Australia in 1950 -- has developed a novel and deadly ability to suppress the immune response of its host rabbits.
New gravitational wave hits Earth -- For the first time, 3 detectors zoom in on its location
27 September 2017For the first time, three detectors have tracked the gravitational waves emitted by a merger of two black holes -- a critical new capability that allows scientists to more closely locate a gravitational wave's birthplace in space.
Turning pathogens against each other to prevent drug resistance
11 December 2017Limiting a much-needed resource could pit pathogens against one another and prevent the emergence of drug resistance.
Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adapt
30 May 2018Zombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.
Nova-like explosion of spinning live bacteria explained
06 April 2018Suspensions of live bacteria in a viscous liquid do not act as expected when spun at certain speeds and now a team of researchers knows why the bacterial aggregation appears to explode when the spinning stops.
Altered body odor indicates malaria even if microscope doesn't
14 May 2018Typhoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year through mosquito vectors. An international team of researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.
Mechanical force controls the speed of protein synthesis
16 May 2018As cells create proteins, the proteins modulate synthesis speed by exerting a mechanical force on the molecular machine that makes them, according to a team of scientists who used a combination of computational and experimental techniques to understand this force.
Newly Described Algae Species Toughens Up Corals to Endure Warming Oceans
14 July 2017Using innovative methods, researchers at Penn State University have identified a new species of stress-tolerant algae that associate with corals in a partnership that promotes the health and growth of coral reef ecosystems.
Antibodies may reveal timing of previous influenza infection
31 July 2017The amount of influenza-specific antibodies present in an individual’s blood can indicate not only if they experienced the flu, but potentially when -- a finding that could improve disease monitoring in the tropics, where flu season is unending.
You can see that from here: New telescope attachment allows ground-based observations of new worlds to rival those from space
05 October 2017A new, low-cost attachment to telescopes allows previously unachievable precision in ground-based observations of exoplanets -- planets beyond our solar system. With the new attachment, ground-based telescopes can produce measurements of light intensity that rival the highest quality photometric observations from space.
Exploring how herpes simplex virus changes when passed between family members
20 October 2017A new study explores how herpes simplex virus might change when passed from one individual to another, information that may prove useful in future development of therapeutics and vaccines.
Malaria parasites sense and adapt to their host’s nutritional status
05 July 2017A new study shows that the infectious agent responsible for malaria, the Plasmodium parasite, is able to sense its host’s nutritional status and actively adapt through changes in gene expression to reduce the number of offspring it produces.
A designer’s toolkit for constructing complex nanoparticles
03 May 2018A team of chemists at Penn State has developed a designer’s toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process.
Big black holes outpace their galaxies in growth
15 February 2018The growth of the biggest black holes in the universe is outrunning the growth of the galaxies that they inhabit, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State.
Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggs
12 February 2018An international team of researchers, including Penn State biologist Charles Fisher, discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of the eggs.
Three types of extreme-energy space particles may have unified origin
22 January 2018New model connects the origins of very high-energy neutrinos, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and high-energy gamma rays with black-hole jets embedded in their environments.
Genes, Ozone, and Autism: Increased risk for autism when genetic variation and air pollution meet
22 June 2017A new analysis shows that individuals with high levels of genetic variation and elevated exposure to ozone in the environment are at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected by adding the two risk factors together.

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