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Andrew Read elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society
Andrew Read elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society 21 May 2015 Andrew F. Read, Evan Pugh Professor of Biology and Entomology and Eberly Professor in Biotechnology at Penn State, has been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society, the leading academy of sciences of the United Kingdom. The Royal Society is a self-governing fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists. The stated purpose of the society is to recognize, promote, and support excellence in science and to encourage the development and use of science for the benefit of humanity. Each year, the Fellows of the Royal Society elect up to 52 new fellows and up to ten new foreign members who have made substantial contributions to the improvement of knowledge in science, engineering, or medicine.

Rao Prize Conference on May 14, 2015 features statistics prize winners
Rao Prize Conference on May 14, 2015 features statistics prize winners 12 May 2015 The Penn State Department of Statistics will host the 2015 Rao Prize Conference on Thursday, May 14, 2015 on the Penn State University Park campus in 102 Thomas Building. This one-day conference, which is free and open to the public, begins with registration at 8:00 a.m. and continues until 5:20 p.m. The full schedule of events is online at http://stat.psu.edu/Events/2015-Rao-Prize .

Schreyer Scholar credited with co-discovery of new pulsar: Never-before-seen star found during NSF-funded educational outreach program
Schreyer Scholar credited with co-discovery of new pulsar: Never-before-seen star found during NSF-funded educational outreach program 11 May 2015 A team of highly determined high school students, which included current Penn State University sophomore and Schreyer Honors College Scholar Cecilia McGough, has discovered a never-before-seen pulsar by painstakingly analyzing data from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Further observations by astronomers using the GBT have revealed that this pulsar has the widest orbit of any around a neutron star and is part of only a handful of double neutron star systems.

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