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Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis 20 August 2014Bacteria growing in near darkness use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy and producing oxygen from sunlight, a research team led by a Penn State University scientist has discovered. The discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the Sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide. A paper describing the discovery will be published in the Science Express edition of the journal Science on 21 August 2014.
Penn State is a Member of the New $678 million Telescope Now Approved for Construction
Penn State is a Member of the New $678 million Telescope Now Approved for Construction 18 August 2014The U.S. National Science Foundation and Department of Energy have completed an agreement to support the $678 million construction costs of a major new tool for studying the universe, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Penn State has been a member institution of the LSST and a participant in its planning since 2005. "The LSST data will provide an unprecedented view of the universe, and will allow investigation of important questions ranging from charting unknown objects in our own solar system, to the large-scale structure of the universe, to the mysterious nature of dark energy and dark matter," said Lawrence Ramsey, a member of the LSST Board of Directors, who is a Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics and an Eberly College of Science Distinguished Senior Scholar at Penn State.
Penn State Joins New Project to Map the Universe
Penn State Joins New Project to Map the Universe 12 August 2014Penn State is an institutional partner in a major new research effort to investigate the structure of our galaxy, the evolution of nearby galaxies, and the nature of dark energy. The effort is the newest phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV), an international collaboration of more than 200 astronomers at over 40 institutions. "The SDSS has been one of the most productive endeavors in the history of astronomy, and it provides exciting scientific opportunities to Penn State faculty and students," remarked Donald Schneider, the head of the Penn State's Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

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