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January 2018 Research Now insert.

Bacteria change a liquid's properties and escape entrapment

Bacteria change a liquid's properties and escape entrapment

A flexible tail allows swimming bacteria to thin the surrounding liquid and to free themselves when trapped along walls or obstacles.

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Potential new target for antimalarial drugs identified

Potential new target for antimalarial drugs identified

A newly described protein could be an effective target for combatting drug- resistant malaria parasites.

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New planet found to be hotter than most stars

New planet found to be hotter than most stars

A newly discovered Jupiter-like world is so hot that even its nights are like the flame of a welding torch.

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Gravitational waves detected

Gravitational waves detected

Scientists worldwide and at Penn State have observed ripples in the fabric of space-time, called gravitational waves, arriving at Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe five times since September 2015.

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New, more sensitive sensor for evaluating drug safety

New, more sensitive sensor for evaluating drug safety

A new technique for evaluating drug safety can detect stress on cells at earlier stages than conventional methods. The new method uses a fluorescent sensor that is turned on in a cell when misfolded proteins begin to aggregate— an early sign of cellular stress.

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Evaluating reproducibility of genome organization studies

Evaluating reproducibility of genome organization studies

A new statistical method to evaluate the reproducibility of data from Hi-C—a cutting- edge tool for studying how the genome works in three dimensions inside of a cell—will help ensure that the data in these “big data” studies is reliable.

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Viruses up their game in arms race with immune system

Viruses up their game in arms race with immune system

In a classic example of the evolutionary arms race between a host and a pathogen, the myxoma virus—introduced to control the rabbit population in Australia in 1950—has developed a novel and deadly ability to suppress the immune response of its host rabbits.

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