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Three faculty members named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellows

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17 October 2018

 

Cui-Zu Chang, Rebekah Dawson, and Xin Zhang have been honored with Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships, prestigious and competitive awards recognizing the research accomplishments of promising young researchers in the early stages of their careers. Fellowships honor early career scholars whose achievements mark them as among the very best scientific minds working today.

Cui-Zu Chang.
Cui-Zu Chang.
Cui-Zu Chang, assistant professor of physics, studies topological materials that allow electrons to move along their surface but not in their interior. In 2013, he experimentally demonstrated for the first time the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a magnetically doped topological insulator lm, where impurities were intentionally introduced to impart magnetism. This work was featured in the scientific background of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics. Chang is also interested in interface superconductivity—the phenomenon of zero electrical resistance on the interface between two solid materials.

 

Rebekah Dawson.
Rebekah Dawson.
Rebekah Dawson, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics, focuses her research on understanding how planetary systems beyond our solar system originate. She is interested in identifying the key factors that contribute to planetary formation and evolution and that lead to the wide variety of planetary orbital and compositional properties observed in extra-solar planets. She combines simulations and theory with statistics and data analysis of observed planets to test theories of the origins of planetary systems.

 

 

Xin Zhang.
Xin Zhang.
Xin Zhang, Holder of the Paul Berg Early Career Professorship and assistant professor of chemistry and of biochemistry and molecular biology, studies how stresses can alter the ways in which proteins fold in live cells. His laboratory develops chemical tools that allow researchers to visualize the folding states of proteins in intact live cells. His research also has application in the development of diagnoses and therapies for human diseases rooted in defective protein folding.