ENVISION: STEM Career Day for Young Women

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Join us at Penn State's University Park campus for a full day of science enrichment, including student and faculty-led workshop sessions, speakers, conversations with academic advisors, and networking opportunities with professional scientists. Come enjoy the chance to ENVISION yourself in STEM! (Registration opens at 10am on January 9th, 2019)

Registration for ENVISION 2019 is now closed. We look forward to seeing our participants soon!

 

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Overview

The primary goal of ENVISION: STEM Career Day for Young Women is to help young women see themselves in the STEM fields. The 2019 ENVISION: STEM Career Day for Young Women is open to all female students who are currently in 6th—12th grade.

Throughout this full-day experience, ENVISION attendees will hear inspiring speakers, explore science concepts through hands-on activities in Penn State facilities, learn from Penn State scientists, mathematicians, and technology experts, and participate in informal conversations with academic advisors, students, and professional scientists. If you are a young woman who wants to learn what women in STEM do, what they can accomplish, and how STEM is relevant to your own journey, this is the event for you!

11th and 12th grade girls - Get more rigorous exposure to a themed set of STEM fields by choosing a track from those listed below!

6th - 10th grade girls - Our Penn State STEM experts have developed interactive workshops that will give you a taste of what all of the STEM fields can offer. Check out the options below to sign up for a specific group of workshops.

If you have any questions about the event, please reach out to the Penn State Science Outreach team at outreach@science.psu.edu or (814) 865-0083.

 

Program Details

 

When: Saturday, January 26th, 2019 9:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Check-in: 9:00 AM - 9:20 AM in the ground floor lobby of Life Sciences Building

Check-out: 4:00pm in the ground floor lobby of Life Sciences Building

How and When to Register:

Registration opens at 10am on January 9th, 2019 and will close on January 21st. The link to register will be posted to our Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/scienceupsu) and this event page. If you would like to join our listserv and receive the registration link via email, please contact us at outreach@science.psu.edu.

Registration Cost:

Registration for the event is now just $20.00 per participant (down from $30), thanks to support from the National Science Foundation! The registration fee covers a t-shirt, drawstring bag, lunch, and all event workshop materials. (Lunch includes a 6” sub or salad, chips, a cookie, and bottled water. The following sub options will be available for selection upon registration: Cold Cut Combo, Ham, Spicy Italian, Turkey, or Veggie, as well as a salad option).

*Please note that we have a "no refund" policy for cancellations!

Group Selection:

At the time of registration, participants will be asked to choose the group they would like to join for the event (first come, first served).  A participant’s group determines which workshop sessions she will rotate to during the day, so please see the group descriptions on this page and select your top choices before going online to register! If a participant’s first choice group is filled, it will not appear as an option on the registration form; please be ready with alternate group choices. A parent or guardian must register each child. Girls wanting to participate with a friend or as a part of a school or scout group will want to decide which group to select together prior to going online to register. (There is a registration option to choose a Labmate. Labmates must register for the same group in order to be paired together.) Please note that unforeseen changes may cause sessions to change.

Financial Aid:

Financial aid is available on a first-come, first-served basis to cover the registration fee if families are in need of support. Families will have the option to request financial aid during registration and the Penn State Science Outreach office will be in contact after we have evaluated each request. If registrants are notified that we are unable to grant them financial aid they will be expected to pay the registration fee at that time.

Required Program Forms:

In compliance with Penn State youth program policies, we will send out a Parent Information Packet via email to all registrants, 1-2 weeks before the event. We will use email addresses provided during registration, so please make sure the email address you enter is correct! This packet will contain general logistical information about ENVISION, as well as all the required forms that must be completed by parents/guardians.

Submission of completed forms may occur as follows:

  • At Check-in. ENVISION check-in will occur from 9:00-9:20 am in the Life Sciences Building ground floor lobby.
  • By mail in advance. Forms must be received by Wednesday, January 23, 2019.  Our mailing address is:

Eberly College of Science - Office of Science Outreach
The Pennsylvania State University
201 Ritenour Building
University Park, PA 16802

  • By fax in advance.  Forms must be received by Thursday, January 24, 2019. Our fax number is: (814)865-0096.
  • NOT by email. For data security reasons we are unable to collect forms via email at this time.

The advance deadlines are to allow our staff sufficient time to process the paperwork and notify you of their receipt before the event. If you do not receive an email confirming receipt of your program forms by Friday, January 25th, that means they did not arrive in time to be processed, and you will need to bring your forms to ENVISION check-in.  If the forms are not completed and turned in at check-in, your child will not be able to participate in ENVISION.


2019 Middle School Groups and Sessions (6th - 8th Grades)


Group #1 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8) - THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL!

  1. Who Runs the World? Girls! (And More Specifically, their Brains....So We Study Them): Guided by a group of brain scientists called "AXONS”, participants will learn about techniques scientists use to study the brain and why studying neuroscience is so important! The AXONS group will lead participants through some myth-busting activities where they debunk some very commonly held myths about the brain. Prepare to be amazed by this phenomenal organ and everything that we are still learning about it!
  2. The Math of Crime Scene Investigation: What's it take to catch a crook? Forensic scientists will show you how they determine how crimes take place. In particular, you'll be helping them determine where a blood splatter comes from, so this one isn't for the faint of heart!
  3. Rocks and Snowballs from Space: Have you ever seen a comet? These cosmic snowballs are some of the most beautiful yet deadly objects in space! Penn State astronomers will show participants some of the defining features of comets and asteroids and illustrate what makes them so dangerous to Earth and why it’s important to understand them.

 

Group #2 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8)

  1. Hydrophobics Have Never Looked So Good: Why are some materials waterproof, while others get soaked? This workshop will teach you about hydrophobic interactions and what different materials do when they interact with water.
  2. Who Runs the World? Girls! (And More Specifically, their Brains....So We Study Them): Guided by a group of brain scientists called "AXONS”, participants will learn about techniques scientists use to study the brain and why studying neuroscience is so important! The AXONS group will lead participants through some myth-busting activities where they debunk some very commonly held myths about the brain. Prepare to be amazed by this phenomenal organ and everything that we are still learning about it!
  3. Finding Planets Dancing with Stars: How do astronomers find planets orbiting faraway stars? They watch them dance! Astronomers from Penn State will guide you through how they analyze starlight to find out how many other worlds are out there.

 

Group #3 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8)

  1. Rocks and Snowballs from Space: Have you ever seen a comet? These cosmic snowballs are some of the most beautiful yet deadly objects in space! Penn State astronomers will show participants some of the defining features of comets and asteroids and illustrate what makes them so dangerous to Earth and why it’s important to understand them.
  2. Secrets and Codes – an Introduction to Cryptography: Cryptography is the practice of studying and hiding information, and has been used for thousands of years to send confidential messages. Come learn how to encode and decode messages using different techniques and learn more about the mathematical underpinnings of code cracking!
  3. You’ve got to Move It, Move It! An Exploration of Primate Locomotor Behavior: What allows humans to walk upright while most animals are stuck on all fours? Anthropologists know it's all about the bones! What allows humans to walk upright while most animals are stuck on all fours? Anthropologists know it's all about the bones! Check out examples of bones, and learn how humans and other primates move around their environments.

 

Group #4 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8) - THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL!

  1. Code it, Build it! In this session, engineers from Penn State's Applied Research Lab will lead you through an in-depth experience that illustrates the dynamic thinking they use every day while designing and building submarines, planes, and more! Come learn how women in engineering make a difference in our everyday lives, and put your engineering skills to the test through a hands-on competition!
  2. Rocks and Snowballs from Space: Have you ever seen a comet? These cosmic snowballs are some of the most beautiful yet deadly objects in space! Penn State astronomers will show participants some of the defining features of comets and asteroids, and will illustrate what makes them so dangerous to Earth and why it’s important to understand them.
  3. Secrets and Codes – an Introduction to Cryptography: Cryptography is the practice of studying and hiding information, and has been used for thousands of years to send confidential messages. Come learn how to encode and decode messages using different techniques, and learn more about the mathematical underpinnings of code cracking!

 

Group #5 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8)

  1. Seeing Like a Satellite: Join SWIG (Supporting Women in Geography) in this session on remote sensing and satellite imagery to answer questions like: “How do we get pictures of the Earth?”, “What can we use them for?”, and “How are they helpful in my everyday life?” By seeing the world through satellites, participants will leave with a much deeper understanding of the powerful natural and human forces that shape our world and our lives!
  2. Insects around Us: Entomological Careers & Technology: What would we do without insects? In this workshop, participants will get a chance to get in the shoes of real Entomology researchers! They’ll get up close and personal with real insects and learn about the important roles these insects play in our ecosystems. Participants will also get a chance to identify and handle insects just like entomologists! *Note: This session is not recommended for participants who don’t like handling or looking at insects!
  3. Exploring Flavor: What Do Food Scientists Do? This will be the tastiest workshop you can experience! Join food scientists in exploring how taste works, why foods taste the way they do, and what exactly allows us to experience these sensations.

 

Group #6 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8)

  1. Insects around Us: Entomological Careers & Technology: What would we do without insects? In this workshop, participants will get a chance to get in the shoes of real Entomology researchers! They’ll get up close and personal with real insects and learn about the important roles these insects play in our ecosystems. Participants will also get a chance to identify and handle insects just like entomologists! *Note: This session is not recommended for participants who don’t like handling or looking at insects!
  2. Planning a Meeting…with Aliens! Is anyone out there? We may not know if there are any aliens out there just yet, but join Penn State astronomers to find out who is looking for them and how they go about the search! Along the way, they’ll take you through some fun activities showing the challenges to finding life in space!
  3. Under Pressure: The pressure's on! Scientists from Graduate Women in Science will work with you through demos and experiments about pressure and what happens to objects when they go through immense pressure changes.

 

Group #7 Workshop Sessions (Middle School – Grades 6-8) - THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL!

  1. The Wonders of Materials Science and Engineering: Have you even wondered how a heart valve works? Why your dentist tightens the band on your braces each month? Or how a space shuttle can withstand thousands of degrees of heat during take-off? The answers lie within incredible material properties and mechanisms. Come explore materials through several demos and lab tours and hear from young females about their experiences in academic research and industry.
  2. Exploring Flavor: What Do Food Scientists Do? This will be the tastiest workshop you can experience! Join food scientists in exploring how taste works, why foods taste the way they do, and what exactly allows us to experience these sensations.
  3. Planning a Meeting…with Aliens! Is anyone out there? We may not know if there are any aliens out there just yet, but join Penn State astronomers to find out who is looking for them and how they go about the search! Along the way, they’ll take you through some fun activities showing the challenges to finding life in space!

 

2019 High School Groups and Sessions (9th - 10th Grades)

 

Group #8 Workshop Sessions (High School – Grades 9-10)

  1. Converting Chemistry to Electricity – The Lemon Battery Challenge: Much of our life is powered by electricity, but how do we make it? It turns out there are many ways to do so, including some very unconventional sources! Join PSU researchers in a quest to make the strongest battery using ingredients you typically find in your kitchen!
  2. The Basics of Bumblebees: Behavior and Biology: Why do bees buzz? Why do some bees sting? And how can we better understand behavior in other organisms? In this session, participants will be using bumble bees as a model to study animal behavior. Participants will be using standard techniques in the field and will be guided by researchers to gain insight on behavior in bumble bees. Participants will also be exposed to a variety of future careers in the field of entomology.
  3. Brains over Brawn: How do Muscles Work? You might use them on a daily basis, but how exactly do muscles work? How do we control them with our brain? If you figure that out, could you control a high schooler's muscles using a computer? You'll find out in this workshop!

 

Group #9 Workshop Sessions (High School – Grades 9-10)

  1. The World of Anatomy and Physiology: The Biology Department would like to welcome ENVISION to the exciting world of human anatomy! You will experience anatomy at the collegiate level; starting in our dry lab with anatomical models, and eventually moving into our cadaver lab. We will be discussing careers and college majors that expand on human anatomy, as well as anatomical gifts and body donation. 
    *Note: Participants will be working with fresh or preserved tissue. As a result, we recommend this experience only for students who are comfortable working with real animal or human tissue. Human tissue is sourced from individuals who have donated their bodies to science. We observe the highest standards when working with their tissue and maintain high expectations for respect in our labs. Please contact the Office of Science Outreach (outreach@science.psu.edu or 814-865-6236) with any specific questions about the workshop.
  2. Brains over Brawn:You might use them on a daily basis, but how exactly do muscles work? How do we control them with our brain? If you figure that out, could you control a high schooler's muscles using a computer? You'll find out in this workshop!
  3. The Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Competition: One of the most important issues of the 21st century will be finding new and alternative sources of energy. Do you have what it takes? In this workshop you’ll get to build a real, working solar cell from scratch!


2019 High School Groups and Sessions (11th - 12th Grades)


Group #10 Workshop Sessions (High School – Grades 11-12): Chemistry and Computers

  1. Fantastic Fragrances- an Introduction to Perfume Chemistry: How do scientists make new smells? It involves chemicals, reactions, a bit of trial and error, and hard work. Find out exactly how it’s done by making some of your own fragrances in this workshop!
  2. The Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell Competition: One of the most important issues of the 21st century will be finding new and alternative sources of energy. Do you have what it takes? In this workshop you’ll get to build a real, working solar cell from scratch!
  3. Code it, Build it! In this session, engineers from Penn State's Applied Research Lab will lead you through an in-depth experience that illustrates the dynamic thinking they use every day while designing and building submarines, planes, and more! Come learn how women in engineering make a difference in our everyday lives, and put your engineering skills to the test through a hands-on competition!

 

Group #11 Workshop Sessions (High School – Grades 11-12): Physiology and Crime-Solving - THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL!

  1. Exploring Flavor: What Do Food Scientists Do? This will be the tastiest workshop you can experience! Join food scientists in exploring how taste works, why foods taste the way they do, and what exactly allows us to experience these sensations.
  2. The World of Anatomy and Physiology: The Biology Department would like to welcome ENVISION to the exciting world of human anatomy! You will experience anatomy at the collegiate level; starting in our dry lab with anatomical models, and eventually moving into our cadaver lab. We will be discussing careers and college majors that expand on human anatomy, as well as anatomical gifts and body donation. 
    *Note: Participants will be working with fresh or preserved tissue. As a result, we recommend this experience only for students who are comfortable working with real animal or human tissue. Human tissue is sourced from individuals who have donated their bodies to science. We observe the highest standards when working with their tissue and maintain high expectations for respect in our labs. Please contact the Office of Science Outreach (outreach@science.psu.edu or 814-865-6236) with any specific questions about the workshop.
  3. The Math of Crime Scene Investigation: What's it take to catch a crook? Forensic scientists will show you how they determine how crimes take place. In particular, you'll be helping them determine where a blood splatter comes from, so this one isn't for the faint of heart!

 

 

 

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