Home > News and Events > Research News

Research Press Release Archive

Main Content

A multi-page list of all research press releases since 1997

MINERVA Telescope Array Dedicated in Ceremony on Mount Hopkins
MINERVA Telescope Array Dedicated in Ceremony on Mount Hopkins 28 May 2015The MINERVA telescope array in Arizona was dedicated in an official ceremony at the facility on Mount Hopkins on May 18, 2015.
Astrobiology students explore alien environment on Earth
Astrobiology students explore alien environment on Earth 20 May 2015Sonny Harman never thought he’d be able to travel far enough to do field work. That’s because the Penn State doctoral student studies atmospheres on other planets. But to his surprise, Harman recently stepped into an alien world -- complete with environments and life unlike just about anything he’d seen on Earth. And he didn’t have to go to Mars to do it. Harman was among a group of graduate students who recently traveled to Italy for an annual astrobiology field course.
Chronic illness causes less harm when carnivores cooperate
Chronic illness causes less harm when carnivores cooperate 17 May 2015Gray wolves in Yellowstone National Park have given researchers the first scientific evidence from wild mammals that living in a group can lessen the impacts of a chronic disease. The research also is one of the first studies to measure the costs of infected non-human individuals of any species on members of their group. A paper describing the research will be published in Ecology Letters on May 18, 2015.
Schreyer Scholar credited with co-discovery of new pulsar: Never-before-seen star found during NSF-funded educational outreach program
Schreyer Scholar credited with co-discovery of new pulsar: Never-before-seen star found during NSF-funded educational outreach program 11 May 2015A team of highly determined high school students, which included current Penn State University sophomore and Schreyer Honors College Scholar Cecilia McGough, has discovered a never-before-seen pulsar by painstakingly analyzing data from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Further observations by astronomers using the GBT have revealed that this pulsar has the widest orbit of any around a neutron star and is part of only a handful of double neutron star systems.
New technique shows shale-drilling additives in drinking-water taps near leak
New technique shows shale-drilling additives in drinking-water taps near leak 05 May 2015Substances commonly used for drilling or extracting Marcellus shale gas foamed from the drinking water taps of three Pennsylvania homes near a reported well-pad leak, according to new analysis from a team of scientists.
Giant gorging black holes may explain rapid growth of infant universe
Giant gorging black holes may explain rapid growth of infant universe 30 April 2015A group of unusual giant black holes may be consuming excessive amounts of matter, according to a new study using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This new finding may help astronomers to understand how the largest black holes were able to grow so rapidly in the early universe. The leaders of the study are astronomers at Penn State University. The new result suggests that some quasars are even more adept at devouring material than scientists previously knew.
New NASA coalition to lead search for life on distant worlds includes two leaders at Penn State
New NASA coalition to lead search for life on distant worlds includes two leaders at Penn State 21 April 2015A new NASA initiative is embracing a team approach to the quest for life on planets around other stars. The new Nexus for Exoplanet System Science initiative (NExSS) is a virtual institute that will benefit from the expertise of several dozen team leaders across the NASA science community in an effort to find clues to life on faraway worlds. Two Penn State University astronomers are among the first sixteen leaders on the NExSS team.
Search for Advanced Civilizations Beyond Earth Finds Nothing Obvious in 100,000 Galaxies
Search for Advanced Civilizations Beyond Earth  Finds Nothing Obvious in 100,000 Galaxies 15 April 2015After searching 100,000 galaxies for signs of highly advanced extraterrestrial life, a team of scientists using observations from NASA's WISE orbiting observatory has found no evidence of advanced civilizations in them. "The idea behind our research is that, if an entire galaxy had been colonized by an advanced spacefaring civilization, the energy produced by that civilization's technologies would be detectable in mid-infrared wavelengths -- exactly the radiation that the WISE satellite was designed to detect for other astronomical purposes," said Jason T. Wright, an assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds at Penn State University, who conceived of and initiated the research.
Inside the most powerful explosions: Discoveries pave the way for next-generation neutrino telescopes
Inside the most powerful explosions: Discoveries pave the way for next-generation neutrino telescopes 10 April 2015New research by an international team that includes Penn State University scientists provides new information about what can happen inside the gigantic bursts of gamma rays that are produced by the catastrophic death of extremely massive stars -- the most powerful explosions in the universe. The research has enabled the scientists to begin solving the mystery of whether these gamma ray bursts are the source of extremely high-energy cosmic rays and neutrinos that bombard Earth as astroparticles from space.
Crowd-Funding Campaign to Accelerate Clinical Trials of New Brain-Repair Discovery Begins on March 30
Crowd-Funding Campaign to Accelerate Clinical Trials of New Brain-Repair Discovery Begins on March 30 30 March 2015Pushing promising new Penn State brain-repair research from the lab into clinical trials is the goal of a quick crowd-funding campaign that kicks off on March 30, 2015. The Penn State research team recently discovered a way to transform one type of brain cell -- called a glial cell -- into healthy, functioning nerve cells to replace nerves damaged by Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, brain or spinal-cord traumas, or stroke.
Benkovic research featured as "Paper of the Week" by The Journal of Biological Chemistry
Benkovic research featured as "Paper of the Week" by The Journal of Biological Chemistry 23 March 2015The Journal of Biological Chemistry has featured as its "Paper of the Week" research led by Stephen J. Benkovic, Evan Pugh Professor of Chemistry and Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Chemistry at Penn State University. A podcast interview with Benkovic, Postdoctoral Associate Hong Zhao, and Penn State Assistant Professor of Molecular Toxicology Andrew Patterson explaining the results of the research is available online. The paper, titled " Quantitative Analysis of Purine Nucleotides Indicates That Purinosomes Increase de Novo Purine Biosynthesis," demonstrates that the cellular synthesis of purines -- multifunctional organic compounds that are a building block of DNA, involved in cellular signaling, and a source of energy in cells -- is directly related to the presence of complexes known as purinisomes.
Research in Action: PML Consortium Grant Seeks to Identify How JC Virus Causes Fatal Brain Disease
Research in Action: PML Consortium Grant Seeks to Identify How JC Virus Causes Fatal Brain Disease 20 March 2015A two-year grant from the PML Consortium awarded to scientists in the Eberly College of Science aims to unravel sequence variations within the JC virus genome that could case the development of a rare fatal brain disease.
First Successful Lab Breeding of Rare Caribbean Coral Species
First Successful Lab Breeding of Rare Caribbean Coral Species 13 March 2015A rare and threatened Caribbean coral species has been successfully bred and raised in the lab for the first time by a research team whose achievement will be published in the scientific journal BMC Ecology. Penn State University Associate Professor of Biology Mónica Medina is among the three scientists on this research team. Its work provides the first photos and documentation of juveniles of this species, and could provide information to aid the conservation of coral reefs in the study area. The team plans to 'out-plant' these lab-grown juveniles in the wild, which could help populations become more resilient to climate change.
Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones
Complex nerve-cell signaling traced back to common ancestor of humans and sea anemones 16 February 2015New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. The research, led by Timothy Jegla, an assistant professor of biology at Penn State University, shows that many of these genes, which when mutated in humans can lead to neurological disease, first evolved in the common ancestor of people and a group of animals called cnidarians, which includes jellyfish, coral, and sea anemones. A paper describing the research is scheduled to be posted online in the Early Edition (EE) of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America sometime during the week beginning February 16, 2015.
Dragonfly gut infections suggest environmental role in obesity
Dragonfly gut infections suggest environmental role in obesity 11 February 2015Obesity and diabetes are not just problems of modern-day humans and their domesticated pets. Insects also are affected by these health conditions, and intestinal infections by protozoans are the cause, according to researchers at Penn State. The research suggests that intestinal infections may contribute to metabolic diseases, including diabetes and obesity, in humans as well.
Research in Action: NSF Grant Helps to Further the Search for Earthlike Exoplanets
Research in Action: NSF Grant Helps to Further the Search for Earthlike Exoplanets 06 February 2015A four-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) is allowing scientists in the Eberly College of Science to better search for Earthlike planets outside of our solar system.
Research in Action: NIJ Grant Allows Penn State Scientists to Explore Heteroplasmic Variants in Mitochondrial DNA
Research in Action: NIJ Grant Allows Penn State Scientists to Explore Heteroplasmic Variants in Mitochondrial DNA 21 January 2015A new grant from the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) will help scientists from Penn State’s Eberly College of Science delve deep into the world of mitochondrial DNA, or mtDNA, used to help solve crime in forensic investigations.
Focus on Research: Research gives new hope for restoring cells in damaged brains and spinal cords
Focus on Research: Research gives new hope for restoring cells in damaged brains and spinal cords 19 January 2015This article, written by Barbara K. Kennedy and featuring the work of Penn State biologist Gong Chen, originally appeared in the Centre Daily Times (CDT) on 17 January 2015 in the "Focus on Research" column, which highlights research projects being conducted at Penn State.
Mathematical approach provides a new step in resolving the mystery of glass
Mathematical approach provides a new step in resolving the mystery of glass 16 January 2015An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians and physicists has developed a new quantitative approach to understanding the mysterious properties of the materials called glasses. The study is described in a paper in the Nature Publishing Group journal Scientific Reports on January 16, 2015. The research, led by Leonid Berlyand, professor of mathematics at Penn State University and Valerii Vinokur, Argonne Distinguished Fellow in the Materials Science Division of the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, enables a breakthrough in the description of the subclass of glasses, known as a “Coulomb glass,” and has wide-ranging application to understanding a variety of glassy systems in nature.
$15 million research grant awarded to Penn State Center for Nanoscience
$15 million research grant awarded to Penn State Center for Nanoscience 12 January 2015The Penn State Center for Nanoscale Science, a National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC), has been awarded a six-year, $15 million grant to continue its research and education program in the development and application of nanoscale materials.

Document Actions

Share this page: |