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A multi-page list of all research press releases since 1997

Caught in the act: 3D structure of an RNA-modifying protein determined in action
Caught in the act: 3D structure of an RNA-modifying protein determined in action 21 April 2016The structure of a bacterial RNA-binding protein has been determined in the act of modifying a molecule of RNA -- an achievement that provides researchers with a unique view of the protein's function in action and could lead to clues that would help in the fight against the development of antibiotic-resistant infections. A paper describing the findings by a team of Penn State University researchers is published in the current issue of the journal Science.
Your viruses could reveal your travel history, and more
Your viruses could reveal your travel history, and more 01 April 2016The genomes of two distinct strains of the virus that causes the common lip cold sore, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), have been identified within an individual person -- an achievement that could be useful to forensic scientists for tracing a person's travel history. The research also opens the door to understanding how a patient's viruses influence the course of disease. The research by an international team led by Moriah L. Szpara, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, will be published in the May 2016 issue of the journal Virology.
Record-breaking ultraviolet winds discovered near black hole
Record-breaking ultraviolet winds discovered near black hole 21 March 2016The fastest winds ever seen at ultraviolet wavelengths have been discovered near a supermassive black hole by a research team that includes a Penn State University astronomer. "This new ultrafast wind surprised us when it appeared at ultraviolet wavelengths, indicating it is racing away from the ravenous black hole at unprecedented speeds -- almost like a bat of out Hell," said William Nielsen (Niel) Brandt, the Verne M. Willaman Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics and a professor of physics at Penn State, a member of the research team.
Keeping ribosomes stuck may stop virulent bacteria strain in its tracks
Keeping ribosomes stuck may stop virulent bacteria strain in its tracks 17 March 2016Compounds that stop a cellular rescue operation for stuck ribosomes may bolster the nation's defenses against biowarfare and bioterrorism, as well as create alternative antibiotics to handle increasingly resistant pathogens, according to a team of researchers.
New method reveals high similarity between gorilla and human Y chromosome
New method reveals high similarity between gorilla  and human Y chromosome 02 March 2016A new, less expensive, and faster method now has been developed and used to determine the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosome in the gorilla. The technique will allow better access to genetic information of the Y chromosome of any species and thus can be used to study male infertility disorders and male-specific mutations. It also can aid in conservation genetics efforts by helping to trace paternity and to track how males move within and between populations in endangered species, like gorillas.
New trigger for self-powered mechanical movement
New trigger for self-powered mechanical movement 25 February 2016A new way to use the chemical reactions of certain enzymes to trigger self-powered mechanical movement has been developed by a team of researchers at Penn State University and the University of Pittsburgh. A paper describing the team's research, titled "Convective flow reversal in self-powered enzyme micropumps," is published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
New clues in the hunt for the sources of cosmic neutrinos
New clues in the hunt for the sources of cosmic neutrinos 18 February 2016The sources of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos that are detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory buried in the Antarctic ice may be hidden from observations of high-energy gamma rays, new research reveals. These high-energy cosmic neutrinos, which are likely to come from beyond our Milky Way Galaxy, may originate in incredibly dense and powerful objects in space that prevent the escape of the high-energy gamma rays that accompany the production of neutrinos.
Impact of climate change on parasite infections depends on host immunity
Impact of climate change on parasite infections depends on host immunity 15 February 2016New research demonstrates how climate change and the immune reaction of the infected individual can affect the long-term and seasonal dynamics of parasite infections. The study, led by Penn State University scientists, assessed the infection dynamics of two species of soil-transmitted parasites in a population of rabbits in Scotland every month for 23 years. The study's results could lead to new strategies for the treatment and prevention of infections from similar parasites in humans, livestock, and wildlife.
Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's Prediction: Opens New Window on the Universe with Observation of Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes
Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's Prediction: Opens New Window on the Universe with Observation of  Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes 11 February 2016For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime, called gravitational waves, arriving at Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This observation confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, published in 1916, and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.
Penn State harnessing research muscle to fight infectious diseases
Penn State harnessing research muscle to fight infectious diseases 09 February 2016It’s easy to forget about the deadly diseases of the past when decades-old breakthroughs in science and medicine have kept them at bay for so long. Diseases like measles, mumps, whooping cough and polio tend to lose their shock value when they’re out of sight and mind — as they have been, by and large, since the mid-20th century.
Discovered: How to unlock inaccessible genes
Discovered: How to unlock inaccessible genes 29 January 2016An international team of biologists has discovered how specialized enzymes remodel the extremely condensed genetic material in the nucleus of cells in order to control which genes can be used. The discovery will be published in the print edition of the journal Nature on February 4, 2016.
What dose of medication is best to prevent the evolution of drug resistance?
What dose of medication is best to prevent the evolution of drug resistance? 28 January 2016A new model shows that the standard practice of treating infections with the highest tolerable dose of anti-microbe medications may not be best for preventing the evolution of drug resistance in all cases. A paper describing the research will be published on January 28, 2016 in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.
Now you see it, now you don't: The quasar that just disappeared
Now you see it, now you don't: The quasar that just disappeared 08 January 2016Astronomers can't find any sign of the supermassive black hole at the center of the quasar named SDSS J1011+5442, and they couldn't be happier. "This is the first time we've seen a quasar shut off this dramatically, this quickly," said Penn State Postdoctoral Scholar Jessie Runnoe, who led the international team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that is reporting this discovery today.
Discovery of a new drug target could lead to novel treatment for severe autism
Discovery of a new drug target could lead to novel treatment for severe autism 04 January 2016Penn State scientists have discovered a novel drug target and have rescued functional deficits in human nerve cells derived from patients with Rett Syndrome, a severe form of autism-spectrum disorder. The research, led by Gong Chen, professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences at Penn State, could lead to a new treatment for Rett Syndrome and other forms of autism-spectrum disorders. A paper describing the research will be published on Jan. 4, 2016, in the online Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Mysterious radio signals from space test Einstein's General Relativity theory
Mysterious radio signals from space test Einstein's General Relativity theory 23 December 2015A new way to test one of the basic principles underlying Einstein's theory of General Relativity using brief blasts of rare radio signals from space called Fast Radio Bursts is 10 times to 100 times better than previous testing methods that used gamma-ray bursts, according to a paper just published in the journal Physical Review Letters. The paper received additional highlighting as an "Editor's Suggestion" due to "its particular importance, innovation, and broad appeal," according to the journal's editors.
Simple mechanism for assembly and disassembly of structures in cells identified
Simple mechanism for assembly and disassembly of structures in cells identified 21 December 2015For the first time, scientists have demonstrated a simple charge-based mechanism for regulating the formation and dissolution of liquid-like structures inside cells. The research provides a first step in deciphering how these poorly-understood structures, which lack outer membranes, function in the cell -- and how they may have evolved. A paper describing the research by Penn State University scientists will appear on December 21, 2015, as an advance online publication of the journal, Nature Chemistry.
New $4.4 million research project targets obesity in Pennsylvania
07 December 2015A deeper understanding of the causes of obesity, and improved treatments for obesity and many of its related health problems, are among the goals of a new $4.4 million, 4-year research grant awarded by the Pennsylvania Department of Health to a team of scientists from Geisinger Health System, Penn State University, and the University of Pennsylvania.
Smartphones enlisted in the battle versus crop disease
Smartphones enlisted in the battle versus crop disease 24 November 2015Crop diseases, a major cause of famine, have always been diagnosed by visual inspection, though scientists today also use microscopes and DNA sequencing. But the first line of defense is still the keen eyes of farmers around the world, many of whom do not have access to advanced diagnostics and treatment advice.
Loss of mastodons aided domestication of pumpkins, squash
Loss of mastodons aided domestication of pumpkins, squash 23 November 2015If Pleistocene megafauna -- mastodons, mammoths, giant sloths and others -- had not become extinct, humans might not be eating pumpkin pie and squash for the holidays, according to an international team of anthropologists.
Space observatory controlled by Penn State captures its 1,000th gamma-ray burst
Space observatory controlled by Penn State captures its 1,000th gamma-ray burst 11 November 2015One thousand of the most powerful explosions in the universe -- gamma-ray bursts -- now have been detected by NASA's Swift Gamma-ray-Burst Explorer satellite, report scientists at Penn State's Mission Operations Center, which controls the science and flight operations for the satellite.

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