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A multi-page list of all research press releases since 1997

NASA's Swift Satellite Marks 10 Years of Game-changing Astrophysics: Mission Control Is at Penn State
NASA's Swift Satellite Marks 10 Years of Game-changing Astrophysics:  Mission Control Is at Penn State 20 November 2014On the tenth anniversary of its launch, NASA’s Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer -- an orbiting space observatory with major and continuing contributions from Penn State scientists -- is recognized as one of the most versatile astrophysics missions ever flown. It remains the only satellite that can precisely locate gamma-ray bursts -- the universe’s most powerful explosions. It also is the only satellite that can monitor the explosions in space across a broad range of wavelengths using multiple instruments before these powerful bursts fade from view.
Major New Study Reveals New Similarities and Differences Between Mice and Humans
Major New Study Reveals New Similarities and Differences Between Mice and Humans 19 November 2014Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse. A new, comprehensive study of the mouse genome by an international group of researchers including Penn State University scientists reveals striking similarities and differences with the human genome. The study may lead to better use of mouse models in medical research.
Battling drug-resistant pathogens: Biologist Andrew Read argues for new treatment strategies in race against rapidly evolving 'bugs.'
Battling drug-resistant pathogens: Biologist Andrew Read argues for new treatment strategies in race against rapidly evolving 'bugs.' 12 November 2014Evolution kills people. Andrew Read has been saying so for years. But he never actually saw it firsthand until he worked this summer in a hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan. That's when Read, who is Evan Pugh Professor of Biology at Penn State, stepped away from his busy University Park lab to study the problem of drug resistance up close, sifting through massive clinical databases and consulting with infectious-disease specialists struggling with difficult cases in real time. He well remembers the first patient he saw die.
First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit
First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit 29 October 2014A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer.
In Disease Outbreak Management, Flexibility Can Save Lives and Money
In Disease Outbreak Management, Flexibility Can Save  Lives and Money 21 October 2014A new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks is being proposed by a team of epidemiologists led by two Penn State University researchers. The team's flexible approach could save many lives and millions of dollars.
Greater Rates of Mitochondrial Mutations Discovered in Children Born to Older Mothers
Greater Rates of Mitochondrial Mutations Discovered in Children Born to Older Mothers 13 October 2014The discovery of a "maternal age effect" by a team of Penn State scientists that could be used to predict the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in maternal egg cells -- and the transmission of these mutations to children -- could provide valuable insights for genetic counseling. These mutations cause more than 200 diseases and contribute to others such as diabetes, cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The study found greater rates of the mitochondrial DNA variants in children born to older mothers, as well as in the mothers themselves. The research will be published in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on October 13, 2014.
Predicting the Future of Antarctic Ice
Predicting the Future of Antarctic Ice 30 September 2014The National Science Foundation's Division of Mathematical Sciences has awarded more than $500,000 to Penn State to develop new statistical methods needed for predicting the future of Antarctic ice sheets. Using information gleaned from geologic data from the past 20,000 years, the scientists also will apply their new methods to provide a better understanding of the past and current behavior of the ice sheets.
Smallest Possible Diamonds Form Ultra-thin Nanothreads
Smallest Possible Diamonds Form Ultra-thin Nanothreads 21 September 2014For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. A paper describing this discovery by a research team led by John V. Badding, a professor of chemistry at Penn State University, will be published in the 21 September 2014 issue of the journal Nature Materials.
Mystery of rare 5-hour space explosion explained with help from US/Russia and US/UK/Italy satellites
Mystery of rare 5-hour space explosion explained with help from US/Russia and US/UK/Italy satellites 17 September 2014Next week in St. Petersburg, Russia, scientists on an international team that includes Penn State University astronomers will present a paper that provides a simple explanation for mysterious ultra-long gamma-ray bursts -- a very rare form of the most powerful explosions in the universe.
Rethinking the Basic Science of Graphene Synthesis
Rethinking the Basic Science of Graphene Synthesis 07 September 2014A new route to making graphene has been discovered that could make the 21st century's wonder material easier to ramp up to industrial scale. Graphene -- a tightly bound single layer of carbon atoms with super strength and the ability to conduct heat and electricity better than any other known material -- has potential industrial uses that include flexible electronic displays, high-speed computing, stronger wind-turbine blades, and more-efficient solar cells, to name just a few under development.
Zombie ant fungi 'know' brains of their hosts
Zombie ant fungi 'know' brains of their hosts 22 August 2014A parasitic fungus that reproduces by manipulating the behavior of ants emits a cocktail of behavior-controlling chemicals when encountering the brain of its natural target host, but not when infecting other ant species, a new study shows.
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis
Hot-spring bacteria reveal ability to use far-red light for photosynthesis 20 August 2014Bacteria that grow in environments enriched in far-red light use a previously unknown process for harvesting energy. This discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth and harvesting energy from the Sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide. This discovery lays the foundation for further research aimed at improving plant growth, harvesting energy from the Sun, and understanding dense blooms like those now occurring on Lake Erie and other lakes worldwide. A paper describing the discovery will be published in the Science Express edition of the journal Science on 21 August 2014.
Penn State is a Member of the New $678 million Telescope Now Approved for Construction
Penn State is a Member of the New $678 million Telescope Now Approved for Construction 18 August 2014The U.S. National Science Foundation and Department of Energy have completed an agreement to support the $678 million construction costs of a major new tool for studying the universe, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Penn State has been a member institution of the LSST and a participant in its planning since 2005. "The LSST data will provide an unprecedented view of the universe, and will allow investigation of important questions ranging from charting unknown objects in our own solar system, to the large-scale structure of the universe, to the mysterious nature of dark energy and dark matter," said Lawrence Ramsey, a member of the LSST Board of Directors, who is a Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics and an Eberly College of Science Distinguished Senior Scholar at Penn State.
Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest
Pygmy phenotype developed many times, adaptive to rainforest 18 August 2014The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought.
Penn State Joins New Project to Map the Universe
Penn State Joins New Project to Map the Universe 12 August 2014Penn State is an institutional partner in a major new research effort to investigate the structure of our galaxy, the evolution of nearby galaxies, and the nature of dark energy. The effort is the newest phase of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV), an international collaboration of more than 200 astronomers at over 40 institutions. "The SDSS has been one of the most productive endeavors in the history of astronomy, and it provides exciting scientific opportunities to Penn State faculty and students," remarked Donald Schneider, the head of the Penn State's Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Impact of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Coral Communities Is Deeper and Broader than Predicted
Impact of Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill on Coral Communities Is Deeper and Broader than Predicted 28 July 2014A new discovery of two additional coral communities showing signs of damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill expands the impact footprint of the 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The discovery was made by a team led by Charles Fisher, professor of biology at Penn State University. A paper describing this work and additional impacts of human activity on corals in the Gulf of Mexico will be published during the last week of July 2014 in the online Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
The Birth of Topological Spintronics
The Birth of Topological Spintronics 23 July 2014The discovery of a new material combination that could lead to a more effcient approach to computer memory and logic will be described in the journal Nature on July 24, 2014. The research, led by Penn State University and Cornell University physicists, studies "spin torque" in devices that combine a standard magnetic material with a novel material known as a "topological insulator." The team's results show that such a scheme can be 10 times more effcient for controlling magnetic memory or logic than any other combination of materials measured to date.
Crowdfunding Campaign Underway to Support Student Research on Sustainable Agriculture
Crowdfunding Campaign Underway to Support Student Research on Sustainable Agriculture 18 July 2014A group of Penn State students led by Assistant Professor of Biology Charles Anderson has launched a crowdfunding campaign to support their new research project in sustainable agriculture, Fast Farming: Feeding a Hot, Dry World. The campaign is the first to launch under a new partnership between Penn State and USEED, a crowd funding platform that partners with universities to enable researchers to invite friends, family members, colleagues, alumni, and the public to support projects that are important to them.
Controversial Clues of Two 'Goldilocks Planets' That Might Support Life are Proven False
Controversial Clues of Two 'Goldilocks Planets' That Might Support Life are Proven False 03 July 2014Mysteries about controversial signals coming from a dwarf star considered to be a prime target in the search for extraterrestrial life now have been solved in research led by scientists at Penn State University.
Live Webcams: Scientists Studying Corals Damaged by Oil in the Gulf of Mexico
Live Webcams: Scientists Studying Corals Damaged by Oil in the Gulf of Mexico 25 June 2014How are the corals doing now, four years after they were damaged by the Deep Water Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? You can find out by watching live webcams and by sending messages to the scientists on a research ship that will be in the Gulf until July 4. The research expedition is led by Chief Scientist Chuck Fisher, a Penn State University professor of biology. Interact with the research crew, listen in, and watch as they explore the ocean floor. The 24/7 live webcams are on the expedition's website, Nautiluslive.org. You also can participate on Facebook (facebook.com/nautiluslive) and Twitter (@EVNautilus).

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