Home > News and Events > 2019 News

2019 News

Main Content

Differences in genes’ geographic origin influence mitochondrial function
A new study explores whether interactions between genomes found in the nucleus of a cell and within the mitochondria of a cell, which are fine-tuned by natural selection over deep evolutionary time, could be altered when genes of different geographic origins are brought together within a genome.
images
Searching the stars
With forward-looking, concurrent development of a new global research hub and a unique graduate curriculum, Penn State is growing the worldwide SETI community, looking for intelligent life across the cosmos.
LaJeunesse and colleagues receive 2017 Tyge Christiansen Prize
The 2017 Tyge Christiansen Prize has been awarded to three Penn Staters by the International Phycological Society, an organization dedicated to the study of algae, including Todd LaJeunesse, associate professor of biology at Penn State, Drew Wham, former graduate student in LaJeunesse’s lab, and Gang Ning, director of Penn State’s Microscopy Facility.
Breakthrough Prize winner Jocelyn Bell Burnell to present Science Achievement Graduate Fellows (SAGF) Lecture January 25
Astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell, winner of the 2018 Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, will present the spring 2019 Science Achievement Graduate Fellows (SAGF) Lecture at Penn State, on Friday, January 25, at 2 p.m. in Paterno Library's Foster Auditorium on the University Park campus.
Science Achievement Graduate Fellows (SAGF) Lecture — "Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student’s Story" 25 January 2019 from 02:00 PM to 03:30 PM Foster Auditorium, Paterno Library
Astrophysicist Jocelyn Bell Burnell, winner of the 2018 Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, will present the spring 2019 Science Achievement Graduate Fellows (SAGF) Lecture at Penn State, on Friday, January 25, at 2 p.m. in Paterno Library's Foster Auditorium on the University Park campus.
2019 Lectures on the Frontiers of Science from 19 January 2019 to 23 February 2019
2019 Frontiers of Science: Cosmic Clues Open New Frontiers in Space Science 19 January 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building
This free public lecture series on six consecutive Saturday mornings begins on January 19 with a lecture by Miguel Mostafá, professor of physics and of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State. His lecture, "Cosmic Messengers from Deep Space Launch a New Era of Discovery," begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in the Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building, on the Penn State University Park campus.
Discovering the beauty of living cells: Science meets coffee shop art
A recent art exhibition in downtown State College featured "The Art of Cell Biology," with 18 works produce by Penn State scientists. Claire Thomas, associate professor of biology and of biochemistry and molecular biology and curator of the exhibit, discusses the exhibit as well as the intersection of science and art.
"Cosmic Messengers from Deep Space Launch a New Era of Discovery" a free public lecture on January 19
A free public lecture titled "Cosmic Messengers from Deep Space Launch a New Era of Discovery" will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 19, on the Penn State University Park campus in Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Sciences Building. The lecture is among the events in the annual Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science. The overall theme of the 2019 series is "Cosmic Clues Open New Frontiers in Space Science." No registration is required.
2019 Frontiers of Science - Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student's Story 26 January 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building
This free public lecture is the second in a series of six on consecutive Saturday mornings during spring semester 2019. Its presenter is Joceln Bell Burnell, Visiting Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Oxford and Professorial Fellow in Physics at Mansfield College in the United Kingdom. In November 2018, she was awarded the prestigious Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Her lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in the Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building, on the Penn State University Park campus.
New method uses ultraviolet light to control fluid flow and organize particles
A new, simple, and inexpensive method that uses ultraviolet light to control particle motion and assembly within liquids could improve drug delivery, chemical sensors, and fluid pumps.
Freedom to hypothesize: Biology professor prepares Scholars for graduate school
Penn State Associate Professor of Biology and Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Claire Thomas helps her students develop an ability to think critically in research situations.
Having stressed out ancestors improves immune response to stress
Having ancestors who were frequently exposed to stressors can improve one's own immune response to stressors, according to researchers at Penn State who studied fence lizards and their stress response. The results suggest that family history should be considered to predict or understand the health implications of stress.
How hot are atoms in the shock wave of an exploding star?
A new method to measure the temperature of atoms during the explosive death of a star will help scientists understand the shock wave that occurs as a result of this supernova explosion.
"Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student's Story" a free lecture for the public on January 26
Two lectures titled "Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student's Story" will be given at the Penn State University Park campus by the newest winner of the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, Jocelyn Bell Burnell, a visiting professor of astrophysics at the University of Oxford, England, and professorial fellow in physics at Mansfield College, England. Both lectures are organized by Penn State's Eberly College of Science.
2019 Frontiers of Science, Lecture 4 - Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves 09 February 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM 104 Keller Building
This free public lecture is the fourth in a series of six on consecutive Saturday mornings during spring semester 2019. Its presenter is Barry C. Barish, Linde Professor of Physics Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology. He is a recipient of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for his contributions to the detection and observation of gravitational waves. His lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in 104 Keller Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
2019 Frontiers of Science, Lecture 5 - The Ghost Particle: A New Tool for Deep-Space Discoveries 16 February 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building
This free public lecture is the fifth in a series of six on consecutive Saturday mornings during spring semester 2019. Its presenter is Doug Cowen, professor of physics and of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State. His lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in the Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building, on the Penn State University Park campus.
2019 Frontiers of Science, Lecture 6 - The Universe Beyond Einstein: Lessons from Primordial Messengers 23 February 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
This free public lecture is the last in a series of six on consecutive Saturday mornings during spring semester 2019. Its presenter is Iavn Agullo, assistant professor of physics at Louisiana State University and a former postdoctoral fellow at Penn State. His lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in the Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building, on the Penn State University Park campus.
Stellar winds, the source material for the universe, are clumpy
Data recorded by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory of a neutron star as it passed through a dense patch of stellar wind emanating from its massive companion star provide valuable insight about the structure and composition of stellar winds.
"The Quantum Universe in the Planck Era and Beyond" a free public lecture on February 2
A free public lecture on Saturday, February 2, in the 2019 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science will begin at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Huck Sciences Building (Berg Auditorium), on the Penn State University Park campus. The speaker for this lecture is J. Richard Bond, University Professor in the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics at the University of Toronto.
Membraneless protocells could provide clues to formation of early life
Membraneless protocells allow RNAs to participate in fundamental chemical reactions, providing clues to early steps in origin of life on earth.
Male birth control for the malaria parasite
Disrupting two genes involved in the preservation of RNA molecules inhibits the ability of the male form of the malaria parasite to mature and be transmitted from human blood into mosquitoes.
Science for all
Students in the Eberly College of Science are creating communities for underrepresented groups to promote a diverse, inclusive scientific enterprise
Eberly College of Science Selected for 2019 Beckman Scholars Program Award
Penn State’s Eberly College of Science has been selected as a 2019 Beckman Scholars Program Awardee by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation, an organization dedicated to advancing research in chemistry and the life sciences. This program recognizes 12 premier undergraduate institutions from across the country with strong faculty and research facilities that support undergraduate research.
Open-access satellite data allows tracking of seasonal population movements
A massive release of passive-surveillance satellite data of nighttime lights could help researchers in fields ranging from agriculture to epidemiology.
Simple drug combination creates new neurons from neighboring cells
A simple drug combination that converts cells neighboring damaged neurons into functional new neurons could potentially be used to treat stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, and brain injuries.
Opening the STEM classroom to students with visual impairments
A student that is blind sits at a desk with a bottle of glue and piece of paper in front of them. He reaches out to run his fingers over the raised lines of dried glue on the paper. This is his first time understanding the shapes of a fingerprint.
"Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves" a free public lecture on February 9
A free public lecture titled "Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves" will be given by Nobel Laureate Barry C. Barish on Saturday, February 9, at 11:00 a.m. in 104 Keller Building on the Penn State University Park campus. Barish is the Maxine and Ronald Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). His lecture is among the six weekly lectures in the 2019 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, which has the overall theme: "Cosmic Clues Open New Frontiers in Space Science." Registration is not required.
Toward automated animal identification in wildlife research
A new program developed by researchers from Penn State and Microsoft Azure automatically detects regions of interest within images, alleviating a serious bottleneck in processing photos for wildlife research.
New method uses fluorescence to identify disease-causing forms of proteins
A new method uses fluorescence to detect potentially disease-causing forms of proteins as they unravel due to stress or mutations.
"The Ghost Particle: A new tool for deep-space discoveries" a free public lecture on February 16
A free public lecture titled "The Ghost Particle: A New Tool for Deep-Space Discoveries" by Doug Cowen, professor of physics and professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, February 16, in 104 Huck Life Sciences Building on the Penn State University Park. His lecture is among the six weekly lectures in the 2019 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science. The overall theme of the 2019 series is "Cosmic Clues Open New Frontiers in Space Science." Registration is not required.
I AM STEM competition empowers students to inspire the next generation of scientists
The I AM STEM competition, founded in 2017 by the Office of Science Outreach, is a way to provide science students with the opportunity to develop their speaking skills and gain confidence in their ability to inspire the next generation of scientists.
2019 Frontiers of Science, Lecture 3: The Quantum Universe in the Planck Era and Beyond 02 February 2019 from 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building
This free public lecture is the third in a series of six on consecutive Saturday mornings during spring semester 2019. Its presenter is J. Richard Bond, University Professor at the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Toronto. His lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at about 12:30 p.m. in the Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building, on the Penn State University Park campus.
Cui-Zu Chang Receives 2019 National Science Foundation CAREER Award
Cui-Zu Chang, assistant professor of physics at Penn State, has been honored with a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award from the National Science Foundation.
Lesieutre from Eberly College of Science named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow
Eberly College of Science’s John Lesieutre, assistant professor of mathematics, has been honored with Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship. This is a prestigious and competitive award given to promising young researchers in the early stages of their careers, in recognition of their research accomplishments.
Penn State’s Habitable Zone Planet Finder Enables Discovery of Planets Around Cool Stars
A new astronomical spectrograph built by a Penn State-led team of scientists provides the highest precision measurements to date of infrared signals from nearby stars, allowing astronomers to detect planets capable of having liquid water on their surfaces that orbit cool stars outside our Solar System.
"The Universe Beyond Einstein: Lessons from Primordial Messengers" a free public lecture on February 23
A free public lecture titled "The Universe Beyond Einstein: Lessons from Primordial Messengers" will be given by Iván Agulló, an assistant professor of physics at Louisiana State University and a former postdoctoral fellow at Penn State, on Saturday, February 23, in 100 Huck Life Sciences Building (Berg Auditorium) on the Penn State University Park campus. His lecture will begin at 11:00 a.m. This presentation is among the six weekly lectures in the 2019 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science. The overall theme of the 2019 series is "Cosmic Clues Open New Frontiers in Space Science." Registration is not required.
Human settlements and rainfall affect giraffe home ranges
Giraffes that live close to densely populated towns have larger home ranges than giraffes that live far from towns.
Iridescent color from clear droplets
Under the right conditions, ordinary clear water droplets on a transparent surface can produce brilliant colors, without the addition of inks or dyes.
Ernest C. Pollard Lecture Set for March 11, 2019
David A. Agard, professor of biochemistry and biophysics and of pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator will present the 2018/2019 Ernest C. Pollard Lecture.
POSTPONED - Pollard Lecture: "To Fold or Not to Fold: The Yin and Yang of Chaperone-mediated Client Activation" 11 March 2019 from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM 108 Wartik Laboratory
David A. Agard, professor of biochemistry and biophysics and of pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator will present the 2018/2019 Ernest C. Pollard Lecture at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 11, 2019.
Freeman Hrabowski named spring 2019 commencement speaker
Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and advocate for the education and advancement of traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields, will deliver the commencement address for the Eberly College of Science undergraduate graduation ceremony.
Eberly College of Science to host entrepreneurship seminars for Penn State Startup Week
The college will host a series of five seminars, to be presented by alumni, faculty, and student entrepreneurs.
Kapinos and Dassama receive 2019 Penn State Alumni Achievement Award
Two graduates of the Eberly College of Science have been selected as recipients of the Penn State Alumni Association's 2019 Alumni Achievement Award: Daniel Kapinos, east coast practice leader for the Equity Services Team at $35B global professional services firm Aon, and Laura M. K. Dassama, assistant professor of chemistry at Stanford University and an Institute Scholar with interdisciplinary research center Stanford ChEM-H.
Millennium Scholars Program, philanthropy support student success in STEM
Thanks to the Penn State Millennium Scholars Program and support from donors like Steve and Kathi Mahle, a growing number of Penn State students are on their way toward earning advanced degrees in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.
Researchers find features that shape mechanical force during protein synthesis
A team of researchers has taken another step toward understanding the mechanical force of protein synthesis, and created a mathematical model that can help guide future work on the process.
International documentary featuring Penn State professors makes US premiere
Dickinson Law Professor Dermot Groome and Eberly College of Science Professor Thomas Parsons participated in one of the largest prosecutions in history at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia at The Hague. “The Trial of Ratko Mladic,” a 90-minute documentary featuring Groome, will be broadcast nationally at 9 p.m. on March 19 on "FRONTLINE" — PBS’ flagship investigative journalism series.
Altered data sets can still provide statistical integrity and preserve privacy
Synthetic networks may increase the availability of some data while still protecting individual or institutional privacy, according to a Penn State statistician.
'A Light in the Dark': One THON captain's journey through cancer
Having personally known children battling pediatric cancer during her years in and out of hospitals, Barker’s own experiences with childhood health struggles fueled her interest in helping THON fight this disease, even if she had never been personally impacted by cancer herself — that is, until her own diagnosis.
$1 million Army grant aimed at adaptive fluid materials
Lauren Zarzar, assistant professor of chemistry at Penn State, has been awarded a five-year, $1 million grant from the U.S. Army to conduct research related to reconfigurable fluids. Zarzar was awarded an Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers grant, which is given by the Army to the nation’s top young investigators.
Penn State exoplanet center celebrates 10-year anniversary
The Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds will commemorate its 10th anniversary with a celebration on April 2, 2019.
Sarah Assmann appointed editor-in-chief of scientific journal The Plant Cell
Sarah M. Assmann, Waller Professor of Biology at Penn State, has been appointed as the Editor-in-Chief of The Plant Cell, one of the top research journals in plant biology.
Crow named recipient of 2019 Eric A. Walker Award
Kelsey Crow, senior double-major in biology and psychology at Penn State, has been named the 2019 recipient of the Eric A. Walker Award.
Penn State students encourage, learn from youngsters in Ugandan orphanage
Students from the Eberly College of Science had their perspectives changed during a service trip to an orphanage in Entebbe, Uganda this winter
David Toews receives early investigator award from American Ornithological Society
David Toews, assistant professor of biology at Penn State, has been selected as the 2019 recipient of the Ned K. Johnson Early Investigator Award by the American Ornithological Society, an international society devoted to advancing the scientific understanding of birds.
Extremely accurate measurements of atom states for quantum computing
A new method allows the quantum state of atomic “qubits”—the basic unit of information in quantum computers—to be measured with twenty times less error than was previously possible, without losing any atoms.
Wright named recipient of SETI Institute's 2019 Drake Award
Jason Wright, an associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State and member of the University's Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, has been named the recipient of the 2019 Drake Award by the SETI Institute.
Marker Lectures in Genetic Engineering scheduled for April 22 and 23
Susan M. Gasser, director of the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research and professor of molecular biology at the University of Basel in Basel, Switzerland, will present the Russell Marker Lectures in Genetic Engineering on April 22 and 23, 2019, at the Penn State University Park campus.
Marker lecture - “How Heterochromatin and BRCA1 Stabilize the Eukaryotic Genome" 22 April 2019 from 06:00 PM to 07:30 PM Berg Auditorium, 100 Huck Life Sciences Building
Susan M. Gasser, director of the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research and professor of molecular biology at the University of Basel in Basel, Switzerland, will present the Russell Marker Lectures in Genetic Engineering on April 22 and 23, 2019, at the Penn State University Park campus. The free public lectures are sponsored by the Penn State Eberly College of Science.
Penn State team earns top spot in international Kaggle hackathon
Students from four colleges blend interdisciplinary backgrounds and shared skills to claim first place in the international Kaggle University Hackathon, the first-ever university hackathon of its kind.
The Serengeti-Mara squeeze: One of the world’s most iconic ecosystems under pressure
Increased human activity around one of Africa’s most iconic ecosystems is “squeezing the wildlife in its core,” damaging habitat and disrupting the migration routes of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle, according to an international study that included a researcher at Penn State.
Friedman Lecture in Astronomy set for April 9
A free presentation titled “The Penn State NASA Suborbital Rocket Program for Astronomy” will take place at 7:00pm on Tuesday, April 9, in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
Baxter and Bortiatynski receive 2019 Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching
Andrew Baxter, associate teaching professor of mathematics, and Jacqueline Bortiatynski, associate teaching professor of chemistry and director of the Center for Excellence in Science Education, have been selected as recipients of the 2019 Penn State George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching.
Joel Waters receives 2019 Penn State Excellence in Advising Award
Joel Waters, academic adviser in biology, has been selected to receive the 2019 Penn State Excellence in Advising Award.
Axtell and Rigol receive 2019 Faculty Scholar Medals
Michael Axtell, professor of biology, and Marcos Rigol, professor of physics, have been selected to receive 2019 Faculty Scholar Medals for Outstanding Achievement.
Shea recognized with 2019 Palmer Faculty Mentoring Award
Katriona Shea, alumni professor of biology in the Eberly College of Science, is the recipient of Penn State's 2019 Howard B. Palmer Faculty Mentoring Award.
Project to prevent bat-borne diseases receives $10 million funding
In an effort to prevent the spread of some of the world's most lethal diseases, an international research team spanning five continents and including Penn State scientists will study bats in Australia, Bangladesh, Madagascar, and Ghana.
Bruce Booth honored with Penn State’s Outstanding Science Alumni Award
Bruce Booth, ‘96 B.S. Biochemistry, has been selected to receive an Outstanding Science Alumni Award for 2019 by the Penn State Eberly College of Science.
Stone Memorial Lecture rescheduled for April 30
Zhijian ‘James’ Chen, director of the Inflammation Research Center and George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, will present the 2018/2019 Robert W. Stone Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 30, on the Penn State University Park campus.
New Time - Stone Memorial lecture: "The Enemy Within – Immune and Autoimmune Responses to Cytosolic DNA" 30 April 2019 from 03:00 PM to 04:30 PM 112 Buckhout Laboratory
Zhijian ‘James’ Chen, director of the Inflammation Research Center and George L. MacGregor Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Science at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, will present the 2018/2019 Robert W. Stone Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 30, on the Penn State University Park campus.
Unjamming the genome after DNA damage: A gene regulatory multi-tool has yet another function
A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.
A new signal for a neutron star collision discovered
A bright burst of X-rays has been discovered by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory—including Penn State researchers—in a galaxy 6.6 billion light years from Earth, an event that likely signals the merger of two neutron stars.
New SCATTIRSTORM microscope could improve bioenergy production
The construction of a new multimodal optical microscope, SCATTIRSTORM, that could enable more efficient bioenergy production, is the focus of a three-year, $1.5 million, U.S. Department of Energy grant awarded to three Penn State researchers.
New computer model automatically, aesthetically crops photos
Computers can now automatically crop photos to capture the most interesting part in an aesthetically pleasing manner, thanks to researchers at Penn State.
Researchers to study genetic roots of Parkinson's disease with NSF grant
A pair of Penn State professors will combine different sources of information to more efficiently identify genes involved in disease progression. Ultimately, this work may help to further precision medicine.
First ever open public alerts from LIGO: Two probable black-hole mergers spotted in first weeks after gravitational-wave detector is updated
Two new probable gravitational waves have been detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo observatory in Italy in the first weeks after the detectors were updated.
Features that make lizards sexy are resilient to stress
Physical traits and behaviors that make a lizard sexy—features used to attract potential mates and fend off competitors—may be important enough that they do not change in the face of stress, according to Penn State researchers.
Sylvia Bintrim to represent Penn State’s Eberly College of Science as student marshal at spring commencement 2019
Sylvia Bintrim of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, will be honored as the student marshal for the Eberly College of Science during Penn State’s spring commencement ceremonies on May 4, 2019.
Six Eberly College of Science students offered graduate funding from National Science Foundation and Department of Energy
Six students from the Penn State Eberly College of Science earned fellowship offers from the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) and the Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program.
Four Eberly College of Science graduate students receive Penn State awards
Four graduate students in the Eberly College of Science were honored for their accomplishments during the 2019 Graduate Student Awards Luncheon, held April 11 at the Nittany Lion Inn.
Lauren Zarzar receives 2019 ACS Unilever Award
Lauren Zarzar, assistant professor of chemistry at Penn State, was selected as the recipient of the 2019 Unilever Award by the Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones
A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.
Unlocking the mystery behind blood clots
New research demonstrates how proteins called “integrins” form an intermediate state between their active and inactive forms that promotes the aggregation of platelets, the blood cells that form clots.
How the bumble bee got its stripes
Researchers have discovered a gene that drives color differences within a species of bumble bees, helping to explain how mimicry—individuals in an area adopting similar color patterns—evolves.
Squire Booker elected as member of the National Academy of Sciences
Squire J. Booker, Evan Pugh Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Penn State, Holder of the Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science, and investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has been elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences.
2019 Rao Prize Conference 06 May 2019 from 08:30 AM to 05:40 PM 100 Life Sciences Building on the Penn State University Park campus
The Penn State Department of Statistics will host the 2019 Rao Prize Conference on Friday, May 6, 2019 in 100 Life Sciences Building on the Penn State University Park campus. This one-day conference, which is free and open to the public, begins with registration at 8:00 a.m. followed by the award ceremony and lectures continuing throughout the day until 5:40 p.m. The full schedule of events and speaker abstracts are online.
Rao Prize Conference on May 6, 2019 features statistics prize winner
The Penn State Department of Statistics will host the 2019 Rao Prize Conference on Monday, May 6, 2019 in 100 Life Sciences Building on the Penn State University Park campus. This one-day conference, which is free and open to the public, begins with registration at 8:30 a.m. followed by the award ceremony and lectures continuing throughout the day until 5:40 p.m. The full schedule of events and speaker abstracts are online.
Penn State physics student joins forces with NASA in Norway
The Student Scoop', an ongoing Q&A series from Penn State's Student Engagement Network, features physics major Joshua Norfolk, who speaks about his experience working alongside NASA in Andøya, Norway.
New research shows promise for success of underrepresented scholars in STEM
New evidence shows positive effects of undergraduate programs at Penn State and other institutions aimed at increasing retention and academic performance of historically underrepresented undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.
NIH grant funds research to pinpoint natural selection’s influence on genomes
A $1.7 million grant through the National Institutes of Health is helping researchers led by Michael DeGiorgio, assistant professor of biology, understand how much influence natural selection has had on humans' evolutionary path.
Undergraduate students develop Math 110 packets for studying
A team of students has finished assembling a study packet series for Math 110: Techniques of Calculus, one of the most-taken mathematics courses at Penn State, through a collaboration between the Department of Mathematics and Penn State Learning. The packets are available at no extra charge to Math 110 students.
Lin selected to participate in Penn State, National Taiwan Normal University collaboration
Penn State and National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU) have announced the awardees for the 2019 Joint Collaboration Development Fund. One project chosen for funding involves Dannis Lin, distinguished professor of statistics.
Alumna Laura Russo receives Robert May Prize from the British Ecological Society
Eberly College of Science alumna Laura Russo has been selected to receive the Robert May Prize from the British Ecological Society for her scientific paper in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.
LIGO and Virgo Detect Neutron Star Smash-Ups
LIGO and Virgo observe five probable gravitational waves in the first month after the observatories were upgraded, including one believed to originate in a never-before-seen neutron star-black hole merger.
Gravitational forces in protoplanetary disks may push super-Earths close to their stars
New research led by Penn State astronomers improves understanding of why very large planets called super-Earths with small, quick orbits form so close to their host stars.
“Hey! I got a question about that” A new podcast/video series from the Eberly College of Science
The Eberly College of Science at Penn State launched a new podcast/video series.
New drug could help treat neonatal seizures
A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns.
All four Penn State Goldwater candidates earn scholarships
For just the second time in Penn State history, all four University candidates to the Goldwater Scholarship program—all undergraduate students in the Eberly College of Science—were named as awardees.
Penn State student Taylor Baum receives PennACE Student of the Year Award
Taylor Baum, a Penn State undergraduate student double majoring in biology and electrical engineering, has been selected to receive the 2018-2019 Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Employers (PennACE) JoAnne Day Student of the Year Award in the STEM category.

Document Actions

Share this page: |