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New research agenda for malaria elimination and eradication
Manuel Llinás, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and Jason Rasgon, professor of entomology and disease epidemiology, have participated in the formulation of an updated research agenda for global malaria elimination and eradication.
Four-dimensional physics in two dimensions
For the first time, physicists have built a two-dimensional experimental system that allows them to study the physical properties of materials that were theorized to exist only in four-dimensional space.
Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant’s genes
Dodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the U.S. and worldwide every year, can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients.
Alien Megastructure not the cause of dimming of the 'Most Mysterious Star in the Universe'
A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University's Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the "most mysterious star in the universe."
Have RNA, will travel: Malaria parasite packs genetic material in preparation for trip from mosquitoes to humans
The parasite that causes malaria has not one, but two, specialized proteins that protect its genetic material until the parasite takes up residence in a new host.
How massive is supermassive? Astronomers measure more black holes, farther away
A team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including several Penn State scientists, announced new measurements of the masses of a large sample of supermassive black holes far beyond the local universe.
Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasite
Researchers have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in the parasite the causes malaria.
"How to Look for a Liveable Planet" is a free public lecture in a series that begins on January 20
A free public lecture titled "How to Look for a Liveable Planet" will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 20, in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus. The event is the first of six consecutive Saturday-morning lectures in the 2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, a free public minicourse that does not require registration or exams.
New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular components
Using a new method to create synthetic neurons, a team of researchers from Penn State explores how the human brain makes a metabolic building block essential for the survival of all living organisms. The team describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus.
Three types of extreme-energy space particles may have unified origin
New model connects the origins of very high-energy neutrinos, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and high-energy gamma rays with black-hole jets embedded in their environments.
2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, Lecture #2 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? 27 January 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
The hunt is on at Penn State to find truly Earth-like planets orbiting the closest stars to the Sun. On January 27, you can hear Penn State's Suvrath Mahadevan, associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics, give an insider's tour of the hunt for planets that are capable of supporting life, including exciting new research efforts led by Penn State scientists. His lecture, "New Tools for Finding the Closest Earth-Like Planets, begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science -- Is There Life on Other Planets? 20 January 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
This free public minicourse on six consecutive Saturday mornings begins on January 20 with a lecture by John Johnson, professor of astronomy and director of graduate studies at Harvard University. His lecture, "Is there Life on Other Planets?" begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at about 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus. After the lecture, he will be available to sign copies of his book, "How Do You Find An Exoplanet?"

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