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New research agenda for malaria elimination and eradication
Manuel Llinás, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and Jason Rasgon, professor of entomology and disease epidemiology, have participated in the formulation of an updated research agenda for global malaria elimination and eradication.
Four-dimensional physics in two dimensions
For the first time, physicists have built a two-dimensional experimental system that allows them to study the physical properties of materials that were theorized to exist only in four-dimensional space.
Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant’s genes
Dodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the U.S. and worldwide every year, can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients.
Alien Megastructure not the cause of dimming of the 'Most Mysterious Star in the Universe'
A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University's Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the "most mysterious star in the universe."
Have RNA, will travel: Malaria parasite packs genetic material in preparation for trip from mosquitoes to humans
The parasite that causes malaria has not one, but two, specialized proteins that protect its genetic material until the parasite takes up residence in a new host.
How massive is supermassive? Astronomers measure more black holes, farther away
A team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), including several Penn State scientists, announced new measurements of the masses of a large sample of supermassive black holes far beyond the local universe.
Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasite
Researchers have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in the parasite the causes malaria.
"How to Look for a Liveable Planet" is a free public lecture in a series that begins on January 20
A free public lecture titled "How to Look for a Liveable Planet" will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 20, in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus. The event is the first of six consecutive Saturday-morning lectures in the 2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, a free public minicourse that does not require registration or exams.
New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular components
Using a new method to create synthetic neurons, a team of researchers from Penn State explores how the human brain makes a metabolic building block essential for the survival of all living organisms. The team describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus.
Three types of extreme-energy space particles may have unified origin
New model connects the origins of very high-energy neutrinos, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and high-energy gamma rays with black-hole jets embedded in their environments.
2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, Lecture #2 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? 27 January 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
The hunt is on at Penn State to find truly Earth-like planets orbiting the closest stars to the Sun. On January 27, you can hear Penn State's Suvrath Mahadevan, associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics, give an insider's tour of the hunt for planets that are capable of supporting life, including exciting new research efforts led by Penn State scientists. His lecture, "New Tools for Finding the Closest Earth-Like Planets, begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science -- Is There Life on Other Planets? 20 January 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
This free public minicourse on six consecutive Saturday mornings begins on January 20 with a lecture by John Johnson, professor of astronomy and director of graduate studies at Harvard University. His lecture, "Is there Life on Other Planets?" begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at about 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus. After the lecture, he will be available to sign copies of his book, "How Do You Find An Exoplanet?"
"New Tools for Finding the Closest Earth-Like Planets" -- a free public lecture on January 27, 2018
"New Tools for Finding the Closest Earth-Like Planets" is the second lecture in the free public minicourse titled "Is There Life on Other Planets?" This series of six lectures is the 2018 edition of the annual Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science. The lectures are given on six consecutive Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
Keiler elected as Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology
Kenneth Keiler, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State, has been elected as a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology.
Is there life on other planets? Learn the latest research on February 3: "Choose Your Own Adventure: Planet Edition"
"Choose Your Own Adventure: Planet Edition" is the third lecture in the free public minicourse titled "Is There Life on Other Planets?" This series of six lectures is the 2018 edition of the annual Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science. The lectures are given on six consecutive Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
2018 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, Lecture #3 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? Learn the latest research on February 3 03 February 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
"Choose Your Own Adventure: Planet Edition" is the title of the next lecture in the 2018 edition of the free public minicourse, the "Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science." On February 3, Sarah Ballard, a Torres Fellow, L'Oreal Fellow, and Postdoctoral Scholar in Exoplanetary Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will describe the latest research about the planets beyond our own solar system that are most likely to have the right conditions for supporting life. Her lecture, "Chose Your Own Adventure: Planet Edition, begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
"The Birth of Habitable Planets" is a free public lecture on February 10
"The Birth of Habitable Planets" is a free public lecture on February 10, presented by Rebekah Dawson, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State. Her lecture is part of the annual Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, which this year has as its theme "Is There Life on Other Planets?" These lectures are given on six consecutive Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
"What makes a planet habitable?" is a free public lecture on February 17
"What makes a planet habitable?" is a free public lecture on February 17 by James Kasting, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Penn State. His presentation is part of the annual Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science -- a series of six consecutive lectures on Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus. The theme of the 2018 series is "Is There Life on Other Planets?"
"How to Hunt for Signs of Alien Life," a free public lecture on February 24
A free public lecture titled "How to Look for a Signs of Alien Life" will begin at 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, January 20, in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus. The speaker, Lisa Kaltenegger, is an associate professor at Cornell University and the director of the university's Carl Sagan Institute.
Lectures on the Frontiers of Science #4 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? Learn the latest research about the birth of habitable planets 10 February 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
"The Birth of Habitable Planets" is the title of the lecture on February 10 in the 2018 edition of the free public minicourse, the "Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science." Penn State Assistant Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics Rebekah Dawson will give a guided tour of whether emerging solar systems could give birth -- or not -- to planets that could support life. Her lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and ends at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
Lectures on the Frontiers of Science #5 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? Learn how scientists are trying to begin solving the mystery of how often critical factors combine on other planets to create liveable conditions 17 February 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
"What makes a planet habitable?" is the title of the next lecture in the 2018 edition of the free public minicourse, the "Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science." On February 7, James Kasting, Evan Pugh Professor of Geosciences at Penn State, will describe the latest research about habitable planets beyond our own solar system. His lecture in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus begins at 11:00 a.m. and will be followed at 12:30 p.m. by an opportunity to obtain an autographed copy of a book authored by Kasting in the lobby of 100 Thomas Building, hosted by the Penn State Bookstore.
Lectures on the Frontiers of Science #6 -- Is There Life on Other Planets? Learn how to look for signs of alien life 24 February 2018 from 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM 100 Thomas Building
"How to Look for a Signs of Alien Life" is the title of the next and final lecture in the 2018 edition of the free public minicourse, the "Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science." On February 24, Lisa Kaltenegger, associate professor and director of the Carl Sagan Institute at Cornell University, will reveal how scientists are using the most advanced new tools on Earth to learn how we can identify the first habitable worlds beyond our solar system. Her lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. and will end at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggs
An international team of researchers, including Penn State biologist Charles Fisher, discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of the eggs.
The Russell E. Marker Lectures in Evolutionary Biology set for February 19th and 20th, 2018
Anne Stone, Regents' Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, will present the Russell E. Marker Lectures in Evolutionary Biology on February 19th and 20th, 2018, at Penn State on the University Park campus.
Marker Lectures in Evolutionary Biology 19 February 2018 from 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM 100 Life Sciences Building
Anne Stone, Regents' Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, will present a lecture intended for a general audience, titled "Tracking a killer: Using ancient DNA to understand the evolutionary history of tuberculosis."
Marker Lectures in Evolutionary Biology 20 February 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM 100 Life Sciences Building
Anne Stone, Regents' Professor in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University, will present a specialized lecture, titled "What does dental calculus tell us about diet, pathogens, and population history?: Preliminary results from the chimpanzees of Gombe."
Big black holes outpace their galaxies in growth
The growth of the biggest black holes in the universe is outrunning the growth of the galaxies that they inhabit, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State.
Runze Li selected as Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Statistics
Runze Li has been appointed as Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Statistics, one of the highest honors awarded to faculty members in the Penn State Eberly College of Science
Squire Booker selected as Holder of the Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science
Squire J. Booker, professor of chemistry and of biochemistry and molecular biology, has been appointed as Holder of the Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science, one of the highest honors awarded to faculty members in the Penn State Eberly College of Science.
Three from Eberly College of Science named Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellows
Three faculty members from the Eberly College of Science have been honored with Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowships.
New crystal structures reveal a mysterious mechanism of gene regulation by the "magic spot"
Using an innovative crystallization technique, an international team of researchers, led by scientists at Penn State, has revealed new insights into the long debated action of the “magic spot”—a molecule that controls gene expression in Eschericahia coli and other bacteria when the bacteria are stressed.
New insights into how cellulose is built could indicate how to break it apart for biofuels
A comprehensive look at how plants build cellulose, the primary building block of the walls of most plant cells that is used in a wide variety of manmade materials, could have important implications for its use in biofuels. Researchers at Penn State have identified the major steps in the process as well as the tools used by plant cells to create cellulose, including proteins that transport critical components to the location where cellulose is made.
Statistician Larry Wasserman to present Chemerda Lectures in Science on March 14 and 15, 2018
Larry A. Wasserman, UPMC Professor of Statistics and Data Science at Carnegie Mellon University, will present two free public lectures on March 14 and 15 as part of the 2018 John M. Chemerda Lectures in Science.
Chemerda Lectures in Science: "The Greatest Debate in the History of Science" 14 March 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:30 PM 102 Thomas Building
Larry A. Wasserman, UPMC Professor of Statistics and Data Science at Carnegie Mellon University, will present the 2018 John M. Chemerda Lectures in Science on March 14 and 15 on the Penn State University Park campus. The free public lectures are sponsored by the Penn State Eberly College of Science. Wasserman will give a public lecture intended for a general audience titled, “The Greatest Debate in the History of Science,” at 4:00 pm on Wednesday, March 14, in 102 Thomas Building.
Chemerda Lectures in Science: "High Dimensional Multinomials and Unsmooth Densities" 15 March 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM 104 Thomas Building
Larry A. Wasserman, UPMC Professor of Statistics and Data Science at Carnegie Mellon University, will present the 2018 John M. Chemerda Lectures in Science on March 14 and 15 on the Penn State University Park campus. The free public lectures are sponsored by the Penn State Eberly College of Science. Wasserman will present a scientific lecture titled, “High Dimensional Multinomials and Unsmooth Densities,” at 4:00 pm on Thursday, March 15, in 104 Thomas Building.
Three from Eberly College of Science named Distinguished Professor
Three faculty members from the Eberly College of Science have been selected to receive the title of Distinguished Professor.
Marker Lectures in Genetic Engineering scheduled for March 12 and 13
Fred M. Winston, John Emory Andrus Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, will present the Russell Marker Lectures in Genetic Engineering on March 12 and 13, 2018, at the Penn State University Park campus.
Marker Lecture in Genetic Engineering 12 March 2018 from 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM 100 Life Sciences Building
Fred M. Winston, John Emory Andrus Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, will present a lecture intended for the general audience, titled "Using Yeast Genetics to Study Gene Expression."
Marker Lecture in Genetic Engineering 13 March 2018 from 03:30 PM to 05:00 PM 100 Life Sciences Building
Fred M. Winston, John Emory Andrus Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, will present a specialized lecture, titled "Factors that Control Transcriptional Accuracy and Chromatin Integrity."
Social statistician and former U.S. Census director Robert Groves to present Clogg Lectures March 26 and 27
Robert M. Groves, Executive Vice President and Provost of Georgetown University and former director of the U.S. Census Bureau will present two free, public lectures as part of the 2018 Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Lectures.
Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Lecture: “Promoting Evidence-Based Policymaking at the National Level” 26 March 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM 102 Thomas Building
Social statistician Robert M. Groves, executive vice president and provost of Georgetown University and former director of the U.S. Census Bureau will present two free, public lectures as part of the 2018 Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Lectures. He will present a lecture intended for a general audience, titled “Promoting Evidence-Based Policymaking at the National Level,” at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 26, in 102 Thomas Building.
Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Lecture: “One Way Forward for Official Statistics in the New Data World” 27 March 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM 117 Osmond Laboratory
Social statistician Robert M. Groves, executive vice president and provost of Georgetown University and former director of the U.S. Census Bureau will present two free, public lectures as part of the 2018 Clifford C. Clogg Memorial Lectures on March 26 and 27 at the Penn State University Park campus. He will present a specialized lecture in statistics and sociology, titled “One Way Forward for Official Statistics in the New Data World,” at 4:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 27, in 117 Osmond Laboratory.
Matthews receives 2018 Penn State Alumni Achievement Award
The Penn State Alumni Association will honor Eberly College of Science alumna Megan Matthews with the Alumni Achievement Award.
NASA set to launch Penn State led experiment
NASA will launch a suborbital sounding rocket carrying a Penn State led experiment to test a newly-developed X-ray spectrograph and study the X-rays from a supernova remnant in the Milky Way galaxy.
Penn State to participate in consortium to demonstrate remote monitoring of nuclear reactors
Penn State researchers will participate in a new international multi-laboratory and multi-university collaboration that harnesses the unusual characteristics of the elusive subatomic particles known as antineutrinos for nuclear nonproliferation.
NASA scientist to present Friedman Lecture in Astronomy on April 10, 2018
Joseph Masiero, a staff scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will give a free presentation titled "You Can't Make a Solar System without Breaking a Few Asteroids" at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10, in 100 Thomas Building.
Friedman Lecture in Astronomy 10 April 2018 from 07:30 PM to 09:00 PM 100 Thomas Building
Joseph Masiero, a staff scientist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, will give a free presentation titled "You Can't Make a Solar System without Breaking a Few Asteroids."
Wendy Hanna-Rose receives Eisenhower Award for Distinguished Teaching
Wendy Hanna-Rose, associate professor and interim department head of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State, has been selected to receive the 2018 Milton S. Eisenhower Award for Distinguished Teaching.
Slavkovic honored with 2018 Graduate Program Chair Leadership Award
Aleksandra Slavkovic, professor of statistics, associate dean for graduate education, and former associate head for graduate studies in the Eberly College of Science, is the 2018 recipient of the Graduate School Alumni Society Graduate Program Chair Leadership Award.
Bernhard Lüscher awarded Faculty Scholar Medal for Outstanding Achievement
Bernhard Lüscher, professor of biology and of biochemistry and molecular biology, has received a 2018 Faculty Scholar Medal for Outstanding Achievement in the Life Sciences.
Read recognized with 2018 President’s Award for Academic Integration
Andrew Read, Evan Pugh University Professor of Biology and Entomology in the Eberly College of Science and the College of Agricultural Sciences, has been awarded the 2018 President’s Award for Excellence in Academic Integration.
Nobel Laureate Rainer Weiss presents "Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves" on April 18, 2018
Rainer Weiss, a 2017 Physics Nobel Laureate, will present the Eberly Family Distinguished Lecture in Science on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in the Freeman Auditorium, 117 HUB-Robeson Center, on the Penn State University Park campus. This free public lecture, titled "Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves," will highlight the discovery for which he received his Nobel Prize.
Nobel Laureate Rainer Weiss presents "Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves" on April 18, 2018 18 April 2018 from 04:00 PM to 05:00 PM 117 HUB-Robeson Center, Penn State University Park
Rainer Weiss, a 2017 Physics Nobel Laureate, will present the Eberly Family Distinguished Lecture in Science on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. in the Freeman Auditorium, 117 HUB-Robeson Center, on the Penn State University Park campus. This free public lecture, titled "Probing the Universe with Gravitational Waves," will highlight the discovery for which he received his Nobel Prize.
Eberly undergraduate students earn Goldwater Scholarships
Two undergraduate students in the Penn State Eberly College of Science have been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship and a third received an honorable mention. The scholarship is among the most competitive honors in the country for undergraduates in the fields of science and mathematics.
Louis Martarano named spring 2018 commencement speaker
Louis A. Martarano, director of the Science BS/MBA accelerated joint degree program at Penn State and an independent consultant, will deliver the commencement address for the Eberly College of Science undergraduate graduation ceremony on May 5, 2018.
Andrew Read elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Andrew Read, Evan Pugh University Professor of Biology and Entomology in Penn State's Eberly College of Science and the College of Agricultural Sciences, has been elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS).
Alumna Sylvia Biscoveanu awarded Soros Fellowship
Eberly College of Science alumna Andrea Sylvia Biscoveanu received the Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship, which provides support for immigrants and children of immigrants who are pursuing a graduate degree in the United States and who are poised to make significant contributions to the nation through their work.
Mackenzie Moon to Represent Penn State's Eberly College of Science as Student Marshal at Spring Commencement 2018
Mackenzie Moon of Enon Valley, Pennsylvania, will be honored as the student marshal for the Eberly College of Science during Penn State University’s spring commencement ceremonies on Saturday, May 5, 2018, on the University Park campus.
A designer’s toolkit for constructing complex nanoparticles
A team of chemists at Penn State has developed a designer’s toolkit that lets them build various levels of complexity into nanoparticles using a simple, mix-and-match process.
Fifty years of statistics at Penn State
Penn State’s Department of Statistics is celebrating its 50th anniversary this month. From humble beginnings in the 1960s, it has grown to become one of the leading centers in the world for research in statistical theory and applications.
Peter Hudson to receive Penn State Honorary Alumni Award
Peter Hudson, Verne M. Willaman Professor of Biology and director of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences at Penn State, has been selected to receive the Honorary Alumni Award from the Penn State Alumni Association.
Amie Boal receives 2018 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award
Amie Boal, assistant professor of chemistry, and of biochemistry and molecular biology, has been selected as one of 13 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholars for 2018 by the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation.
Four Eberly College of Science graduate students receive Penn State awards
Four graduate students in the Eberly College of Science were honored for their accomplishments during the annual Graduate Student Awards Luncheon.
Penn State student Paige Laughlin receives PennACE Student of the Year Award
Penn State undergraduate student Paige Laughlin has been selected to receive the 2017 Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Employers (PennACE) JoAnne Day Student of the Year Award in the technical category.
Study of climate change could lead to understanding future of infectious disease
Over the past 34 years, rainfall in Uganda has decreased by about 12 percent even though many of the global climate models predict an increase in rainfall for the area, according to an international team of researchers. Rainfall levels in Uganda impact agriculture, food security, wildlife habitats and regional economics as well as the prevalence of certain diseases.
Penn State–developed plant-disease app recognized by Google
A mobile app designed by Penn State researchers to help farmers and others diagnose crop diseases has earned recognition from one of the world's tech giants.
New sodium-ion electrolyte may find use in solid-state batteries
A newly discovered structure of a sodium-based material allows the materials to be used as an electrolyte in solid-state batteries, according to researchers from Penn State and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The team is fine-tuning the material using an iterative design approach that they hope will shave years off the time from research to everyday use.
Compound made inside human body stops viruses from replicating
A team of researchers has identified the mode of action of viperin, a naturally occurring enzyme in humans and other mammals that is known to have antiviral effects on viruses such as West Nile, hepatitis C, rabies, and HIV. This discovery could allow researchers to develop a drug that could act as a broad-spectrum therapy for a range of viruses.
Squire Booker honored as an Evan Pugh Professor
Penn State Professor of Chemistry and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Squire J. Booker, Holder of the Eberly Distinguished Chair in Science and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, has been named an Evan Pugh Professor
Abhay Ashtekar honored as an Evan Pugh Professor
Penn State Professor of Physics Abhay Ashtekar, Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Physics and Director of the Penn State Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, has been named an Evan Pugh Professor.
Edward O’Brien honored with OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award
Edward O’Brien, assistant professor of chemistry, has been selected to receive the American Chemical Society OpenEye Outstanding Junior Faculty Award in Computational Chemistry for new research, which utilized computational chemistry methods to identify new mechanical forces acting on ribosomes, the molecular machines that make proteins.
Capturing light in a waveguide array: Confined, insensitive light could improve lasers, solar cells
Cheaper and more efficient photonic devices, such as lasers, optical fibers, and other light sources, may be possible with confined light that is unaffected by imperfections in the material that confines it, according to new research.
Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adapt
Zombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions.
Nova-like explosion of spinning live bacteria explained
Suspensions of live bacteria in a viscous liquid do not act as expected when spun at certain speeds and now a team of researchers knows why the bacterial aggregation appears to explode when the spinning stops.
Altered body odor indicates malaria even if microscope doesn't
Typhoid Mary may have infected a hundred or more people, but asymptomatic carriers of malaria infect far more people every year through mosquito vectors. An international team of researchers is working toward a way to identify malaria patients including infected individuals who show no malaria symptoms.
Mechanical force controls the speed of protein synthesis
As cells create proteins, the proteins modulate synthesis speed by exerting a mechanical force on the molecular machine that makes them, according to a team of scientists who used a combination of computational and experimental techniques to understand this force.
Eberly College of Science promotions in academic rank, effective July 1, 2018
Fourteen tenured and tenure-line faculty in the Eberly College of Science have been promoted, effective July 1.
Eberly College of Science undergraduate to conduct engineering research in Japan
Eberly College of Science student Benjamin Piazza will study nanomaterial science in Japan as part of the Nakatani Research & International Experiences for Students Fellowship for U.S. students.
Eberly College of Science undergraduate earns Astronaut Scholarship
Eberly College of Science undergraduate Taylor Baum has been selected to receive an Astronaut Scholarship by the Astronaut Scholarship Foundation.
Finding the proteins that unpack DNA
A new method allows researchers to systematically identify specialized proteins that unpack DNA inside the nucleus of a cell, making the usually dense DNA more accessible for gene expression and other functions.
Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated
According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. These findings suggest that management strategies for this species are outdated.
Peter Hudson recognized as "Humanitarian of the Year" by Kish Bank
Peter Hudson, the Willaman Professor of Biology and director of the Huck Institutes of the Life Sciences, was recognized by Kish Bank with its Humanitarian of the Year Award on June 21.
Eberly College of Science fixed-term faculty promotions, effective July 1, 2018
Nineteen fixed-term faculty members in the Eberly College of Science have been promoted, effective July 1.
'Nuru' becomes African farmers' newest ally against fall armyworm
Penn State researchers have joined forces with the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization to release the first app, called Nuru, to help African farmers recognize fall armyworm — a new and fast-spreading crop pest in sub-Saharan Africa — so that they can take immediate steps to destroy it and curb its spread.
The hidden complexity underlying a common cause of autism: Uncovering genetic interactions responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders
Genes located in a large chromosomal aberration associated with autism interact with each other to modulate the variable symptoms of the disease, according to new research.
AstroFest turns twenty! Four Evenings of Astronomy Activities and Stargazing During Arts Festival 2018
Now in its twentieth year, Penn State’s popular AstroFest program will offer four nights of astronomy activities and stargazing during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts. The program will take place from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m nightly from July 11 to July 14.
AstroFest 2018 11 July 2018 from 08:30 PM to 11:30 PM Davey Laboratory
Penn State’s popular "AstroFest" program, a four-night festival of astronomy activities and stargazing during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, will welcome visitors from Wednesday, July 11, through Saturday, July 14, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. each night
Murali Haran named head of Department of Statistics
Murali Haran, professor of statistics, has been named the new head of the Department of Statistics, effective July 1, 2018.
New era of space research launched by IceCube Observatory and global team of astronomers
The first-ever identification of a deep-space source of the super-energetic subatomic high-energy neutrino particles has launched a new era of space research. Detection of one such neutrino beneath the Antarctic ice sent a global team of astronomers racing to track down its origins: a flaring supermassive black hole 3.7 billion light years from Earth.
Dawson honored with Powe Award
Rebekah Dawson, assistant professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State, has been awarded the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award by Oak Ridge Associated Universities
AstroFest 2018 - Thursday 12 July 2018 from 08:30 PM to 11:30 PM Davey Laboratory
Penn State’s popular "AstroFest" program, a four-night festival of astronomy activities and stargazing during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, will welcome visitors from Wednesday, July 11, through Saturday, July 14, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. each night
AstroFest 2018 - Friday 13 July 2018 from 08:30 PM to 11:30 PM Davey Laboratory
Penn State’s popular "AstroFest" program, a four-night festival of astronomy activities and stargazing during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, will welcome visitors from Wednesday, July 11, through Saturday, July 14, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. each night
AstroFest 2018 - Saturday 14 July 2018 from 08:30 PM to 11:30 PM Davey Laboratory
Penn State’s popular "AstroFest" program, a four-night festival of astronomy activities and stargazing during the Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, will welcome visitors from Wednesday, July 11, through Saturday, July 14, from 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. each night
Luiz de Viveiros to receive Department of Energy Early Career Research Program funding
Luiz de Viveiros, assistant professor of physics, has been selected to receive funding for his research as part of the Department of Energy's Early Career Research Program.
Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation funding renewed
The Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Formation (CLSF), an Energy Frontiers Research Center (EFRC) led by Penn State scientists, has once again had its funding renewed by the DOE for an additional four years.
Shaby wins NSF CAREER Award to model extreme weather events
Receiving a National Science Foundation CAREER award is helping Penn State professor Ben Shaby create statistical models for extreme events such as large forest fires, floods and heavy rainstorms to help make better decisions on infrastructure, preparation and mitigation.
Jon McKellar to Represent Penn State's Eberly College of Science as Student Marshal at Summer Commencement 2018
Jon McKellar of Exton, Pennsylvania, will be honored as the student marshal for the Eberly College of Science during Penn State University’s summer commencement ceremonies on Saturday, August 11, 2018, on the University Park campus.
Community-based conservation management has positive effect on wildlife
Putting land management in the hands of local communities helps the wildlife within, according to new research by Penn State biologist Derek Lee.
Wendy Hanna-Rose named head of Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Wendy Hanna-Rose, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, has been named the new head of the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

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