Home > News and Events > 2016 News

2016 News

Main Content

Now you see it, now you don't: The quasar that just disappeared
Now you see it, now you don't: The quasar that just disappeared 08 January 2016Astronomers can't find any sign of the supermassive black hole at the center of the quasar named SDSS J1011+5442, and they couldn't be happier. "This is the first time we've seen a quasar shut off this dramatically, this quickly," said Penn State Postdoctoral Scholar Jessie Runnoe, who led the international team of astronomers from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that is reporting this discovery today.
Top high-energy astrophysics prize awarded to Niel Brandt
Top high-energy astrophysics prize awarded to Niel Brandt 15 January 2016The prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize has been awarded this year to W. Niel Brandt, the Verne M. Willaman Professor of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Penn State. The prize is the top award given each year by the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society, the largest professional organization of astronomers in the United States.
New research to fight human diseases: a free public minicourse starts on January 23, 2016
New research to fight human diseases: a free public minicourse starts on January 23, 2016 18 January 2016"Cures, Treatments, Prevention: Medical research from labs to hospitals to homes" is the focus of the 2016 Penn State Lectures on the Frontiers of Science, a series of six weekly lectures designed as a free public minicourse. The lectures are on Saturday mornings from January 23 to February 27 in 100 Thomas Building from 11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on the Penn State University Park campus.
Mastro to be awarded PA Breast Cancer Coalition grant at January 26 event
Mastro to be awarded PA Breast Cancer Coalition grant at January 26 event 20 January 2016Andrea Mastro, professor of microbiology and cell biology at Penn State University, will be presented with a grant from the statewide research grants program of the PA Breast Cancer Coalition on Tuesday, January 26, 2016 at 10:30 a.m. in the lobby of N/S Frear Building on the Penn State University Park campus.
New Hope for Brain Repair: a free public presentation on January 30
New Hope for Brain Repair: a free public presentation on January 30 25 January 2016A free public lecture titled "New Hope for Brain Repair" will be given by Gong Chen, professor of biology and the Verne M. Willaman Chair in Life Sciences, on January 30 at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus.
What dose of medication is best to prevent the evolution of drug resistance?
What dose of medication is best to prevent the evolution of drug resistance? 28 January 2016A new model shows that the standard practice of treating infections with the highest tolerable dose of anti-microbe medications may not be best for preventing the evolution of drug resistance in all cases. A paper describing the research will be published on January 28, 2016 in the journal PLOS Computational Biology.
Discovered: How to unlock inaccessible genes
Discovered: How to unlock inaccessible genes 29 January 2016An international team of biologists has discovered how specialized enzymes remodel the extremely condensed genetic material in the nucleus of cells in order to control which genes can be used. The discovery will be published in the print edition of the journal Nature on February 4, 2016.
How to Stop an Epidemic: a free public presentation on February 6
How to Stop an Epidemic:  a free public presentation on February 6 01 February 2016A free public lecture titled "How to Stop an Epidemic" will be given by Matthew Ferrari, assistant professor of biology and statistics at Penn State University, on February 6, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus. During his lecture, Ferrari will answer the question "When an infectious disease like Ebola or measles erupts somewhere on Earth, what is the best way to harness limited healthcare resources to stop its spread?
New antibiotics for Drug-Resistant Infections is a free public presentation on February 13
New antibiotics for Drug-Resistant Infections  is a free public presentation on February 13 07 February 2016A free public lecture titled "New Antibiotics for Drug-Resistant Infections" will be given by Kenneth Keiler, professor of biolochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, on February 13, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus. During his lecture, Keiler will describe his discovery of an entirely new kind of antibiotic made from molecules discovered by his team that have broad-spectrum antibiotic powers to make bacteria incapable of protein synthesis.
Penn State harnessing research muscle to fight infectious diseases
Penn State harnessing research muscle to fight infectious diseases 09 February 2016It’s easy to forget about the deadly diseases of the past when decades-old breakthroughs in science and medicine have kept them at bay for so long. Diseases like measles, mumps, whooping cough and polio tend to lose their shock value when they’re out of sight and mind — as they have been, by and large, since the mid-20th century.
Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's Prediction: Opens New Window on the Universe with Observation of Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes
Gravitational waves detected 100 years after Einstein's Prediction: Opens New Window on the Universe with Observation of  Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes 11 February 2016For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime, called gravitational waves, arriving at Earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This observation confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity, published in 1916, and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.
Impact of climate change on parasite infections depends on host immunity
Impact of climate change on parasite infections depends on host immunity 15 February 2016New research demonstrates how climate change and the immune reaction of the infected individual can affect the long-term and seasonal dynamics of parasite infections. The study, led by Penn State University scientists, assessed the infection dynamics of two species of soil-transmitted parasites in a population of rabbits in Scotland every month for 23 years. The study's results could lead to new strategies for the treatment and prevention of infections from similar parasites in humans, livestock, and wildlife.
New clues in the hunt for the sources of cosmic neutrinos
New clues in the hunt for the sources of cosmic neutrinos 18 February 2016The sources of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos that are detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory buried in the Antarctic ice may be hidden from observations of high-energy gamma rays, new research reveals. These high-energy cosmic neutrinos, which are likely to come from beyond our Milky Way Galaxy, may originate in incredibly dense and powerful objects in space that prevent the escape of the high-energy gamma rays that accompany the production of neutrinos.
"Invented: A better tool against cancer" is a free public lecture on February 20
"Invented: A better tool against cancer"  is a free public lecture on February 20 18 February 2016A free public lecture titled "Invented: A better tool against cancer" will be given on February 20, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus. The speaker will be Huck Distinguished Chair in Bioengineering Science and Mechanics Tony Jun Huang, a professor of engineering science and mechanics, of chemical engineering, and of chemistry at Penn State University.
"Anti-Cancer Drugs" is a free public lecture on February 27
"Anti-Cancer Drugs"  is a free public lecture on February 27 23 February 2016A free public lecture titled "Anti-Cancer Drugs: Discovery and Development" will be given on February 27, 2016, by Raymond J. Hohl, a professor of medicine and of pharmacology at Penn State University who also is the director of the Penn State Cancer Institute. The lecture begins at 11:00 a.m. in 100 Thomas Building on the Penn State University Park Campus.
Mikael Rechtsman receives Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in physics
Mikael Rechtsman receives Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in physics 24 February 2016Mikael Rechtsman, an assistant professor of physics at Penn State University, has been honored with an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship in recognition of his research accomplishments. The Sloan Foundation states that "the fellowships honor early-career scientists and scholars whose achievements and potential identify them as rising stars, the next generation of scientific leaders." Candidates for Sloan Research Fellowships are nominated by fellow scientists and the Fellows are selected by a panel of senior scholars for their "independent research accomplishments, creativity, and potential to become a leader in his or her field."
New trigger for self-powered mechanical movement
New trigger for self-powered mechanical movement 25 February 2016A new way to use the chemical reactions of certain enzymes to trigger self-powered mechanical movement has been developed by a team of researchers at Penn State University and the University of Pittsburgh. A paper describing the team's research, titled "Convective flow reversal in self-powered enzyme micropumps," is published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
New method reveals high similarity between gorilla and human Y chromosome
New method reveals high similarity between gorilla  and human Y chromosome 02 March 2016A new, less expensive, and faster method now has been developed and used to determine the DNA sequence of the male-specific Y chromosome in the gorilla. The technique will allow better access to genetic information of the Y chromosome of any species and thus can be used to study male infertility disorders and male-specific mutations. It also can aid in conservation genetics efforts by helping to trace paternity and to track how males move within and between populations in endangered species, like gorillas.
Phillips honored with Stephen and Patricia Benkovic Early Career Professorship
Phillips honored with Stephen and Patricia Benkovic Early Career Professorship 03 March 2016Scott Phillips, an associate professor of chemistry at Penn State University and holder of the Lou Martarano Career Development Professorship, has been honored with the inaugural Stephen and Patricia Benkovic Early Career Professorship. Stephen J. Benkovic, an Evan Pugh Professor of Chemistry and Holder of the Eberly Family Chair in Chemistry at Penn State University, and Patricia Benkovic, a research associate in chemistry at Penn State, established the professorship to support outstanding early career faculty in the Penn State Eberly College of Science. The professorship offers early recognition for outstanding accomplishments and provides financial support to promising young faculty members to encourage establishing a commitment to teaching and explore new areas of research.
NSF funds national user facility for $17.8 million to develop 2-D crystals
NSF funds national user facility for $17.8 million to develop 2-D crystals 04 March 2016The National Science Foundation announced today, March 4, the award of $17.8 million over 5 years to Penn State to fund one of only two Materials Innovation Platform national user facilities in the country. These MIP awards are the first of what will become a national infrastructure to support key scientific research areas.

Document Actions

Share this page: |