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Acoustic tweezers manipulate cell-to-cell contact
Acoustic tweezers manipulate cell-to-cell contact 22 December 2014Sound waves can precisely position groups of cells for study without the danger of changing or damaging the cells, according to a team of Penn State researchers who are using surface acoustic waves to manipulate cell spacing and contact.
Gilliland is Part of Team that Wins Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics
Gilliland is Part of Team that Wins Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics 16 December 2014Ronald L. Gilliland, professor of practice in astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State University, is a member of a team of scientists that is being recognized with the 2015 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics. Gilliland and other members of the High-z Supernova Project are being recognized along with members of the Supernova Cosmology Project for demonstrating that the expansion of the universe is accelerating, rather than slowing as had long been assumed. The award, which recognizes major insights into the deepest questions of the universe, includes a $3 million prize that will be split among members of the teams.
Victor Cotton to Represent Penn State's Eberly College of Science as Student Marshal at Fall Commencement 2014
Victor Cotton to Represent Penn State's Eberly College of Science as Student Marshal at Fall Commencement 2014 11 December 2014Victor Cotton of Hershey, Pennsylvania will be honored as the student marshal for the Eberly College of Science during Penn State University's fall commencement ceremonies on Saturday, 20 December 2014 on the University Park campus. Cotton's faculty escort for the commencement exercises will be James Strauss, senior lecturer in biology.
Living African group discovered to be the most populous humans over the last 150,000 years
Living African group discovered to be the most populous humans over the last 150,000 years 04 December 2014New genetic research reveals that a small group of hunter-gatherers now living in Southern Africa once was so large that it comprised the majority of living humans during most of the past 150,000 years. Only during the last 22,000 years have the other African ethnicities, including the ones giving rise to Europeans and Asians, become vastly most numerous. Now the Khoisan (who sometimes call themselves Bushmen) number about 100,000 individuals, while the rest of humanity numbers 7 billion. Their lives and ways have remained unaltered for hundreds of generations, with only recent events endangering their hunter-gatherer lifestyles. The study's findings will be published in the journal Nature Communications on 4 December 2014.
Four Alumni Honored with Penn State's Outstanding Science Alumni Award
Four Alumni Honored with Penn State's Outstanding Science Alumni Award 03 December 2014The Penn State University Eberly College of Science has selected four alumni to be honored with the Outstanding Science Alumni Award for the year 2014. The Board of Directors of the Eberly College of Science Alumni Society established this award to recognize alumni who have a record of significant professional achievements in their field and who are outstanding role models for students in the college. Receiving this award are: Eric Freed, '85 B.S. Molecular and Cell Biology Ann Hornschemeier, '99 M.S. Astronomy and Astrophysics; '02 Ph.D. Astronomy and Astrophysics John W. Pierce, Jr., '76 B.S. Biochemistry Kathryn Roeder, '88 Ph.D. Statistics
Eight Penn State researchers named AAAS Fellows
Eight Penn State researchers named AAAS Fellows 24 November 2014Eight Penn State faculty members have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the organization announced today.
Eberly College of Science names Cavener interim dean
Eberly College of Science names Cavener interim dean 24 November 2014Douglas R. Cavener, professor and head of biology in the Eberly College of Science, will serve as interim dean for the college until a permanent hire is made.
Penn State senior selected as Marshall Scholar
Penn State senior selected as Marshall Scholar 24 November 2014Ryan Henrici, a Penn State Schreyer Honors College scholar, has been selected to receive a prestigious Marshall Scholarship, a highly sought-after program that finances American college students to study in the United Kingdom.
NASA's Swift Satellite Marks 10 Years of Game-changing Astrophysics: Mission Control Is at Penn State
NASA's Swift Satellite Marks 10 Years of Game-changing Astrophysics:  Mission Control Is at Penn State 20 November 2014On the tenth anniversary of its launch, NASA’s Swift Gamma-ray Burst Explorer -- an orbiting space observatory with major and continuing contributions from Penn State scientists -- is recognized as one of the most versatile astrophysics missions ever flown. It remains the only satellite that can precisely locate gamma-ray bursts -- the universe’s most powerful explosions. It also is the only satellite that can monitor the explosions in space across a broad range of wavelengths using multiple instruments before these powerful bursts fade from view.
Major New Study Reveals New Similarities and Differences Between Mice and Humans
Major New Study Reveals New Similarities and Differences Between Mice and Humans 19 November 2014Powerful clues have been discovered about why the human immune system, metabolism, stress response, and other life functions are so different from those of the mouse. A new, comprehensive study of the mouse genome by an international group of researchers including Penn State University scientists reveals striking similarities and differences with the human genome. The study may lead to better use of mouse models in medical research.
Penn State Schreyer Scholar wins 2014 International Children's Peace Prize
Penn State Schreyer Scholar wins 2014 International Children's Peace Prize 19 November 2014Penn State student and first-year Schreyer Honors College scholar Neha Gupta today (Nov. 18) accepted the 2014 International Children’s Peace Prize Award for her exceptional work to raise money for underprivileged children around the world. She is a scholar in the Eberly College of Science and will be entering the pre-medicine program.
Battling drug-resistant pathogens: Biologist Andrew Read argues for new treatment strategies in race against rapidly evolving 'bugs.'
Battling drug-resistant pathogens: Biologist Andrew Read argues for new treatment strategies in race against rapidly evolving 'bugs.' 12 November 2014Evolution kills people. Andrew Read has been saying so for years. But he never actually saw it firsthand until he worked this summer in a hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan. That's when Read, who is Evan Pugh Professor of Biology at Penn State, stepped away from his busy University Park lab to study the problem of drug resistance up close, sifting through massive clinical databases and consulting with infectious-disease specialists struggling with difficult cases in real time. He well remembers the first patient he saw die.
First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit
First detailed picture of a cancer-related cell enzyme in action on a chromosome unit 29 October 2014A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer.
Penn State Dean Chosen as Chancellor of New Research University in Ecuador
 Penn State Dean Chosen as Chancellor of New Research University in Ecuador 23 October 2014Daniel Larson, Verne Willaman Dean of Penn State University's Eberly College of Science, will leave Penn State in January 2015 to become the founding chancellor of Yachay University, the first research university in Ecuador. Also known as Yachay Tech, the institution aspires to become a leading global research university in the basic and applied sciences and one that will stimulate knowledge-based business and address pressing societal needs in Ecuador and beyond. Yachay Tech is being built as the core of the new Yachay City, the first planned city of Latin America whose purpose is to become the engine powering science, technology, research, and innovation. As chancellor, Larson will be the chief academic officer. His responsibilities will include hiring the deans, department heads, and faculty members, as well as establishing the academic directions of the new university. Larson's formal introduction at Yachay Tech will occur during Convocation 2014, the celebration of the beginning of the university's first academic classes on October 28, 2014.
In Disease Outbreak Management, Flexibility Can Save Lives and Money
In Disease Outbreak Management, Flexibility Can Save  Lives and Money 21 October 2014A new approach for responding to and managing disease outbreaks is being proposed by a team of epidemiologists led by two Penn State University researchers. The team's flexible approach could save many lives and millions of dollars.
Greater Rates of Mitochondrial Mutations Discovered in Children Born to Older Mothers
Greater Rates of Mitochondrial Mutations Discovered in Children Born to Older Mothers 13 October 2014The discovery of a "maternal age effect" by a team of Penn State scientists that could be used to predict the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in maternal egg cells -- and the transmission of these mutations to children -- could provide valuable insights for genetic counseling. These mutations cause more than 200 diseases and contribute to others such as diabetes, cancer, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The study found greater rates of the mitochondrial DNA variants in children born to older mothers, as well as in the mothers themselves. The research will be published in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on October 13, 2014.
Song Tan Awarded C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching
Song Tan Awarded C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching 02 October 2014Song Tan, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State, has been honored with the 2014 C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching by the Eberly College of Science Alumni Society. Instituted in 1972 and named in honor of Clarence I. Noll, dean of the college from 1965 to 1971, the award is the highest honor for undergraduate teaching in the college. Students, faculty members, and alumni nominate outstanding faculty members who best exemplify the key characteristics of a Penn State educator, and a committee of students selects the award winners from the group of nominees.
Daniel Costantino Awarded C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching
 Daniel Costantino Awarded C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching 02 October 2014Daniel Costantino, lecturer in physics, has been honored with the 2014 C.I. Noll Award for Excellence in Teaching by the Eberly College of Science Alumni Society. Instituted in 1972 and named in honor of Clarence I. Noll, dean of the college from 1965 to 1971, the award is the highest honor for undergraduate teaching in the college. Students, faculty members, and alumni nominate outstanding faculty members who best exemplify the key characteristics of a Penn State educator, and a committee of students selects the award winners from the group of nominees.
Meredith Defelice Receives George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching
02 October 2014Meredith Defelice, a senior lecturer in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Penn State, has received the George W. Atherton Award for Excellence in Teaching. The award honors excellence in teaching at the undergraduate level across all Penn State colleges and campuses. Defelice is one of six awardees for 2014. In March, Penn State’s then president, Rodney Erickson, presented Defelice with the award in a ceremony at the Nittany Lion Inn.
Predicting the Future of Antarctic Ice
Predicting the Future of Antarctic Ice 30 September 2014The National Science Foundation's Division of Mathematical Sciences has awarded more than $500,000 to Penn State to develop new statistical methods needed for predicting the future of Antarctic ice sheets. Using information gleaned from geologic data from the past 20,000 years, the scientists also will apply their new methods to provide a better understanding of the past and current behavior of the ice sheets.

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